Not enough pediatricians providing lifestyle counseling

Not enough pediatricians providing lifestyle counseling

(HealthDay) -- Less than half of adolescents are advised by their pediatric health care provider to eat healthily and exercise more, but rates of counseling are higher among obese teens, according to a study published online June 4 in Pediatrics.

Lan Liang, Ph.D., from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality in Rockville, Md., and colleagues analyzed data from adolescents ages 11 to 17 years (6,911 girls and 6,970 boys) who participated in the 2001 to 2007 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey and reported having at least one visit to a health provider in the previous 12 months.

The researchers found that 47 percent of girls and 44 percent of boys were advised by a health provider to eat healthily, and 36 percent of boys and girls were advised to exercise more. Obese boys and girls were both significantly more likely to be advised to eat healthily (odds ratio [OR], 2.10 and 1.70, respectively) and exercise more (OR, 2.37 and 1.90, respectively) than were adolescents of normal weight. Overweight boys and girls were counseled at a much lower rate than . Teens living in the northeast, from higher-income households, with parents who had at least some college education, or who had a usual source of medical care were more likely to receive diet and .

"Greater efforts should be made to incorporate guidelines on screening and counseling into clinical practice," the authors write.

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

“Feeling Fat” Is Worse Than Being It

Jun 20, 2008

In the course of the KiGGS study, almost 7000 boys and girls aged between 11 and 17 years were weighed and asked about their self-assessment, ranging from “far too thin” to “far too fat.” In addition, they all completed ...

School-based exercise program improves bone mass, size

May 30, 2012

(HealthDay) -- A long-term, school-based exercise program for children is associated with increased bone mass and size, with no increase in the fracture risk, according to a study published online May 28 in ...

Recommended for you

Helping babies survive

Nov 21, 2014

A healthy baby is born in the Haydom Lutheran Hospital in Tanzania. She is given the name Precious and her proud mother is ready to take her back to the village. Many children born in the same hospital, or ...

Unstable child care can affect children by age four

Nov 20, 2014

A new study from UNC's Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute (FPG) reveals that disruptions in child care negatively affect children's social development as early as age 4. However, the study also ...

Parental involvement still essential in secondary school

Nov 20, 2014

Although students become more independent as they rise through grade levels and parent-teacher interactions typically lessen as students age, parental involvement in a child's education during the secondary ...

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.