Similar outcomes for robot-aided, conventional nephrectomy

Similar outcomes for robot-Aided, conventional nephrectomy
Robot-assisted and conventional laparoscopic partial nephrectomies have similar outcomes and complication rates, according to a study published in the July issue of The Journal of Urology.

(HealthDay) -- Robot-assisted and conventional laparoscopic partial nephrectomies have similar outcomes and complication rates, according to a study published in the July issue of The Journal of Urology.

Jonathan S. Ellison, M.D., from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, and colleagues compared perioperative outcomes and complications from conventional laparoscopic and robot-assisted partial nephrectomy cases from January 2007 to June 2010. Robot-assisted partial nephrectomies were performed by a heterogeneous group of surgeons, while a single experienced performed the conventional procedures. One hundred eight pairs of patients were matched by age, hilar nature of the tumor, approach, and R.E.N.A.L. (radius, exophytic/endophytic properties, nearness of tumor to collecting system or sinus, anterior/posterior, location relative to polar lines) nephrometry score.

The researchers found that nephrometry score, age, gender, side, and American Society of Anesthesia physical status classification were similar between the groups. Conventional laparoscopic partial nephrectomy had better operative time. Robot-assisted partial nephrectomy showed significant improvements in estimated and warm ischemia time compared to the conventional laparoscopic group. The postoperative complication rates and complication distributions by Clavien classification and type were similar for both groups (41.7 percent for the conventional group and 35.0 percent for the robot-assisted group).

"Robot-assisted partial nephrectomy has a noticeable but rapid learning curve," write the authors. "After it is overcome the robotic procedure results in perioperative outcomes similar to those achieved with conventional laparoscopic partial nephrectomy done by an experienced surgeon."

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