A new target in acute myeloid leukemia

Acute myeloid leukemia, a common leukemia in adults, is characterized by aberrant proliferation of cancerous bone marrow cells. Activating mutations in a protein receptor known as FLT3 receptor are among the most prevalent mutations observed in acute myeloid leukemias. FLT3 mutants are thought to activate several signaling pathways that contribute to cancer development.

Dr. Daniel Tenen and colleagues from Harvard University in Boston discovered a new pathway activated by FLT3 mutation. Their results show that cyclin dependent kinase 1 (CDK1), a critical regulator of cell division is activated in FLT3 mutated leukemias, leading to the activation of downstream .

Most importantly, they demonstrate that inhibiting CDK1 activity promotes differentiation of cells from patient-derived peripheral blood samples.

As clinical trials with CDK1 inhibitors are ongoing, their data strongly suggest that therapies targeting the CDK1 pathway may be efficacious for acute myeloid leukemias with FLT3 mutation, especially in patients resistant to FLT3 inhibitor therapies.

More information: Targeting CDK1 promotes FLT3-activated acute myeloid leukemia differentiation through C/EBPα, Journal of Clinical Investigation, 2012.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Americans undergo colonoscopies too often, study finds

2 hours ago

Colonoscopies are a very valuable procedure by which to screen for the presence of colorectal cancer. However, it seems that healthy Americans who do undergo this sometimes uncomfortable examination often ...

User comments