Bortezomib ups response, survival in multiple myeloma

Bortezomib ups response, survival in multiple myeloma
For patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma, induction treatment with a combination of bortezomib, doxorubicin, and dexamethasone followed by bortezomib maintenance therapy improves complete response, progression-free survival, and overall survival rates, according to a study published online July 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

(HealthDay) -- For patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM), induction treatment with a combination of bortezomib, doxorubicin, and dexamethasone (PAD) followed by bortezomib maintenance therapy improves complete response (CR), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) rates, according to a study published online July 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Pieter Sonneveld, M.D., Ph.D., of the Erasmus Medical Center in Rotterdam, Netherlands, and colleagues conducted an open-label, randomized phase III trial involving 827 patients with newly diagnosed, symptomatic MM. Participants were randomized to receive induction therapy with vincristine, , and dexamethasone (VAD) or PAD, followed by high-dose and autologous stem-cell transplantation. VAD-treated patients received thalidomide as the maintenance treatment and PAD-treated patients received maintenance .

Compared to VAD, the researchers found that PAD induction yielded statistically significant superior CR and near CR rates (31 versus 15 percent). The CR rate was also significantly improved with bortezomib (49 versus 34 percent). Compared to those treated with VAD, patients treated with PAD had superior PFS after a median of 41 months (median 35 versus 28 months; hazard ratio, 0.75; P = 0.002) and overall survival was superior in multivariate analysis (hazard ratio, 0.77; P = 0.049). The benefits of bortezomib induction and maintenance therapy were greatest in high-risk patients with creatinine levels in excess of 2 mg/dL and in those with deletion 17p13.

"This randomized multicenter trial in patients with MM who were eligible for high-dose therapy demonstrates that bortezomib during induction and maintenance treatment results in a better response, quality of response, PFS, and OS," the authors write.

The study was funded in part by Janssen-Cilag-Ortho Biotech. Several authors and the German Multicenter Myeloma Group disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.

More information: Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Pepper and halt: Spicy chemical may inhibit gut tumors

11 hours ago

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that dietary capsaicin – the active ingredient in chili peppers – produces chronic activation of a receptor on cells lining ...

Expressive writing may help breast cancer survivors

13 hours ago

Writing down fears, emotions and the benefits of a cancer diagnosis may improve health outcomes for Asian-American breast cancer survivors, according to a study conducted by a researcher at the University of Houston (UH).

Taking the guesswork out of cancer therapy

18 hours ago

Researchers and doctors at the Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (IBN), Singapore General Hospital (SGH) and National Cancer Centre Singapore (NCCS) have co-developed the first molecular test ...

Brain tumour cells found circulating in blood

19 hours ago

(Medical Xpress)—German scientists have discovered rogue brain tumour cells in patient blood samples, challenging the idea that this type of cancer doesn't generally spread beyond the brain.

International charge on new radiation treatment for cancer

20 hours ago

(Medical Xpress)—Imagine a targeted radiation therapy for cancer that could pinpoint and blast away tumors more effectively than traditional methods, with fewer side effects and less damage to surrounding tissues and organs.

User comments