Cadmium linked to plaque development in older women

Cadmium linked to plaque development in older women
Cadmium levels in blood and urine are independently associated with the development of atherosclerotic plaques in older women, according to a study published online July 20 in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

(HealthDay) -- Cadmium levels in blood and urine are independently associated with the development of atherosclerotic plaques in older women, according to a study published online July 20 in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

Björn Fagerberg, M.D., Ph.D., from the Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Gothenburg, Sweden, and colleagues analyzed data from a screening-based cohort involving 599 64-year-old Caucasian women. Participants were stratified into groups with normal glucose tolerance, impaired glucose tolerance, and diabetes. Cadmium concentrations were measured in blood and urine at baseline, and ultrasound was performed to determine the prevalence and area of in the carotid arteries.

The researchers found that, at baseline, after adjustment for confounders, blood cadmium levels correlated with increased risk of plaque and a large plaque area. Blood cadmium levels correlated positively with plaque area at baseline for women who had never smoked. After adjustment for confounders, at follow-up, the occurrence of large plaques and the change in plaque area correlated with blood and creatinine-corrected urinary cadmium concentrations at baseline. Blood and urine cadmium levels provided additional information to established cardiovascular risk factors for predicting the progress of atherosclerosis.

"In conclusion, we have shown that cadmium exposure is an independent factor related to the development of atherosclerotic plaques both at baseline and at follow-up in a cohort of 64-year-old women with varying degrees of ," the authors write. "From a public health perspective, it is important to determine the role of cadmium exposure as a causal factor in cardiovascular disease."

The study was funded in part by AstraZeneca.

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Dietary cadmium may be linked with breast cancer risk

Mar 15, 2012

Dietary cadmium, a toxic metal widely dispersed in the environment and found in many farm fertilizers, may lead to an increased risk of breast cancer, according to a study published in Cancer Research, a journal of the Am ...

Cadmium investigated as cause of endometrial cancer

Jun 09, 2010

McDonald's announced a recall recently of 12 million "Shrek"-themed collectible glasses because traces of the toxic metal cadmium were found in them. Cadmium, a silver-white metal, is found in many substances, including certain ...

Body's bacteria affect atherosclerosis

Oct 18, 2010

New findings suggesting that bacteria in the mouth and/or intestine can affect the the outcome pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and lead to new treatment strategies, reveals research from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden.

Inflammation worsens danger due to atherosclerosis

Jan 22, 2009

Current research suggests that inflammation increases the risk of plaque rupture in atherosclerosis. The related report by Ovchinnikova et al, "T cell activation leads to reduced collagen maturation in atherosclerotic plaques ...

Recommended for you

Mutation may cause early loss of sperm supply

13 minutes ago

Brown University biologists have determined how the loss of a gene in male mice results in the premature exhaustion of their fertility. Their fundamental new insights into the complex process of sperm generation ...

No more bleeding for 'iron overload' patients?

2 hours ago

Hemochromatosis (HH) is the most common genetic disorder in the western world, and yet is barely known. Only in the US 1 in 9 people carry the mutation (although not necessarily the disease).

3-D printing offers innovative method to deliver medication

7 hours ago

3-D printing could become a powerful tool in customizing interventional radiology treatments to individual patient needs, with clinicians having the ability to construct devices to a specific size and shape. That's according ...

Mystery of the reverse-wired eyeball solved

Feb 27, 2015

From a practical standpoint, the wiring of the human eye - a product of our evolutionary baggage - doesn't make a lot of sense. In vertebrates, photoreceptors are located behind the neurons in the back of the eye - resulting ...

Neurons controlling appetite made from skin cells

Feb 27, 2015

Researchers have for the first time successfully converted adult human skin cells into neurons of the type that regulate appetite, providing a patient-specific model for studying the neurophysiology of weight ...

User comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Osiris1
not rated yet Jul 31, 2012
My wife who died in 2009 was a lifelong smoker, and she worked with ceramics. The paints/glazes used on ceramics that get fired in kilns all contain varying amounts of lead and cadmium and other heavy metals. Figuring in her bad health was atherosclerosis that I first heard was ascribed to smoking. Now this could also be a factor as well? I believe so!
Osiris1
1 / 5 (1) Aug 01, 2012
My wife who died in 2009 was a lifelong smoker, and she worked with ceramics. The paints/glazes used on ceramics that get fired in kilns all contain varying amounts of lead and cadmium and other heavy metals. Figuring in her bad health was atherosclerosis that I first heard was ascribed to smoking. Now this could also be a factor as well? I believe so!

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.