Study identifies the most effective methods for reducing unplanned hospital admissions

Study identifies the most effective methods for reducing unplanned hospital admissions

Unplanned admissions make up approximately 40 per cent of hospital admissions in England and can increase problems for health services as they are costly, disruptive, and lengthen waiting lists. New research, published today has evaluated several key interventions aimed at reducing unplanned admissions and identified those which are most effective.

The research team, led by academics from the Universities of Bristol, Cardiff and NHS Bristol with funding from the National Institute for (NIHR), undertook an evaluation of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of thirteen interventions to assess which were successful in the reduction of unplanned admission or re-admission to a secondary care acute hospital. 

Using data from 274 studies, the researchers carried out a systematic literature review which assessed interventions that included case management, specialist clinics, community interventions such as home visits, systematic reviews for patients, medication reviews, education and self management, exercise and rehabilitation, telemedicine, vaccine programmes, and hospital-at-home following early discharge.

The findings show that education and self management, exercise and rehabilitation and telemedicine in selected patient populations, and specialist heart failure interventions can help reduce unplanned admissions by up to 60 per cent.  However, the evidence to date suggests that the majority of the remaining interventions included in this analysis do not help reduce unplanned admissions in a wide range of patients.

Dr Sarah Purdy, lead researcher from Bristol’s School of Social and Community Medicine, said:  “The results of this research are important for policy makers, clinicians and researchers as few studies include evaluation of system-wide approaches.  

“The research shows which of the interventions are more effective. Some interventions that are shown to have no impact on rates of unplanned hospital admission may have impact in other areas, for example case management appears to reduce length of hospital stay.”

Deborah Evans, the Chief Executive of NHS Bristol, added: “These findings are significant for the as they highlight the importance of robust evaluation of interventions and we welcome having evidence of which interventions reduce unplanned hospital admissions which are often distressing for patients. We have to balance this against other interventions, which might not affect unplanned admissions, such as patients being allowed to go home from hospital with help which often helps their recovery.”

The study was funded under the NIHR Research for Patient Benefit programme and is entitled ‘Interventions to reduce unplanned : a systematic review’.

More information: www.apcrc.nhs.uk/library/resea… h_reports/index.html

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Too many drugs for many older patients

May 16, 2012

Older patients are increasingly prescribed multiple drugs that, when combined, can lead to negative side effects and poor health outcomes.  A new Cochrane Library evidence review reveals that little is kno ...

Falls prevention in Parkinson's disease

Oct 12, 2011

A study carried out by the Primary Care Research Group at the Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry, supported by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) and NIHR PenCLAHRC, has analysed the results of an ...

Recommended for you

Humiliation tops list of mistreatment toward med students

1 minute ago

Each year thousands of students enroll in medical schools across the country. But just how many feel they've been disrespected, publicly humiliated, ridiculed or even harassed by their superiors at some point during their ...

Surrogate offers clues into man with 16 babies

8 hours ago

When the young Thai woman saw an online ad seeking surrogate mothers, it seemed like a life-altering deal: $10,000 to help a foreign couple that wanted a child but couldn't conceive.

Nurses go on strike in Ebola-hit Liberia

8 hours ago

Nurses at Liberia's largest hospital went on strike on Monday, demanding better pay and equipment to protect them against a deadly Ebola epidemic which has killed hundreds in the west African nation.

ALS Ice Bucket Challenge arrives in North Korea

Aug 31, 2014

It's pretty hard to find a novel way to do the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge by now, but two-time Grammy-winning rapper Pras Michel, a founding member of the Fugees, has done it—getting his dousing in the center ...

Cold cash just keeps washing in from ALS challenge

Aug 28, 2014

In the couple of hours it took an official from the ALS Association to return a reporter's call for comment, the group's ubiquitous "ice bucket challenge" had brought in a few million more dollars.

User comments