New study to explore emotion and food connection

(Medical Xpress) -- Among the greatest concerns for females in an age of celebrity culture is the issue of body image. Concerns about how we look can take over our lives and significantly impact our mood and relationships.

Today’s advertising and pop cultures rely on us having insecurities. But what do those insecurities mean for everyday people – not just the celebrities we see on television and read about in magazines?

Macquarie University researchers are now investigating the relationship between eating and emotions in a new study which seeks to shed light on how these concerns develop and persist and how best to treat them.

“These concerns are among the most common issues for modern women, but there is still a lot about unhelpful thoughts and eating behaviors that we don’t know about. This unique and interactive study will hopefully shed some light and help us develop new treatments,” said Lauren Gatt, a psychology honours researcher at Macquarie.

If you are a female over age 18 years who currently feels their eating is out of control or if you are scared of losing control of your weight, you are invited to participate in the new study. It will involve completing a brief questionnaire, completing a verbal task and viewing a presentation consisting of images and music while connected to non-invasive electrodes designed to measure body function.

The study will take 30 minutes, and sessions will take place at Macquarie’s North Ryde campus. All participants will go into a draw to win a $50 Myer gift card in return for their time.

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