Immunosuppressant switch cuts skin cancer post-transplant

Immunosuppressant switch cuts skin cancer post-transplant
In kidney-transplant patients with at least one cutaneous squamous-cell carcinoma, switching immunosuppressants (from calcineurin inhibitors to sirolimus) is associated with increased skin cancer-free survival and delayed development of new skin cancers, according to a study published in the July 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

(HealthDay) -- In kidney-transplant patients with at least one cutaneous squamous-cell carcinoma, switching immunosuppressants (from calcineurin inhibitors to sirolimus) is associated with increased skin cancer-free survival and delayed development of new skin cancers, according to a study published in the July 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Sylvie Euvrard, M.D., from the Edouard Herriot Hospital Group in Lyon, France, and colleagues randomly assigned 120 kidney-transplant recipients who were receiving and had at least one cutaneous squamous-cell carcinoma to continue receiving calcineurin inhibitors (56 patients) or transition to (64 patients).

At two years, the researchers found that the sirolimus group had significantly longer survival free of cutaneous squamous-cell carcinoma. New cutaneous squamous-cell carcinomas developed in fewer patients taking sirolimus (22 versus 39 percent; relative risk 0.56) and after a significantly longer median interval (15 versus seven months). were more frequent in the sirolimus group, and these were twice as frequent in patients converted to sirolimus with rapid protocols compared with progressive protocols. Twenty-three percent of patients discontinued sirolimus due to adverse events. There were no graft rejections noted.

"In conclusion, in this study involving kidney-transplant recipients with at least one previous cutaneous squamous-cell carcinoma, conversion from calcineurin inhibitors to sirolimus was associated with a lower risk of subsequent skin cancers," Euvrard and colleagues write.

The study was partially funded by Pfizer; several authors disclosed financial ties to pharmaceutical companies, including Pfizer.

More information: Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Switching immunosuppressants reduces cancer risk in kidney

Nov 02, 2009

Switching to a newer type of immunosuppressant drug may reduce the high rate of skin cancer after kidney transplantation, according to research being presented at the American Society of Nephrology's 42nd Annual Meeting and ...

Recommended for you

Immune checkpoint inhibitors may work in brain cancers

49 minutes ago

New evidence that immune checkpoint inhibitors may work in glioblastoma and brain metastases was presented today by Dr Anna Sophie Berghoff at the ESMO Symposium on Immuno-Oncology 2014 in Geneva, Switzerland.

New model of follow up for breast cancer patients

4 hours ago

Public health researchers from the University of Adelaide have evaluated international breast cancer guidelines, finding that there is potential to improve surveillance of breast cancer survivors from both a patient and health ...

Immunotherapy set to revolutionise cancer treatment

5 hours ago

Immunotherapy is set to revolutionise the treatment of cancer, according to ESMO President Professor Rolf A. Stahel. His comments come as the ESMO Symposium on Immuno-Oncology 2014 is about to open in Geneva, Switzerland ...

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.