Lymphovascular invasion is independent predictor of survival

Lymphovascular invasion is independent predictor of survival
In patients with invasive breast cancer, lymphovascular invasion is a strong and independent predictor of both breast cancer-specific survival and distant metastasis-free survival, according to a study published in the Aug. 1 issue of Cancer.

(HealthDay) -- In patients with invasive breast cancer, lymphovascular invasion (LVI) is a strong and independent predictor of both breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), according to a study published in the Aug. 1 issue of Cancer.

To assess the prognostic value of definite LVI in clinically and molecularly relevant staging subgroups, Emad A. Rakha, F.R.C.Path., of the Nottingham University Hospital Trust in the United Kingdom, and colleagues conducted a study based on a series of 3,812 consecutive patients who had operable (pathologic T1 [pT1]-pT2, pathologic N0 [pN0]-pN3, M0) breast cancer.

The researchers found that, in the entire series and in different subgroups, LVI was a strong and of BCSS and DMFS. In multivariate analysis, LVI independently predicted BCSS and DMFS in patients with operable breast cancer; in the pT1a-pT1c/pN0 and pT2/pN0 subgroups; in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive and ER-negative tumors; and in human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2)-negative and triple-negative tumors. In patients with lymph-node negative tumors, LVI was associated with a survival disadvantage similar to that of having one or two involved lymph nodes (pN0 to pN1) or a one size category (pT1 to pT2).

"LVI has independent prognostic significance particularly in the low-risk pT1-pT2/N0 subgroup," the authors write. "We advocate the incorporation of LVI status into staging systems."

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Radiation after mastectomy improves breast cancer survival

Jun 02, 2010

Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) for some breast cancer patients can reduce their risk of recurrence by almost 30 percent and increase their five-year overall survival by almost 50 percent, according to a study in ...

Recommended for you

New breast cancer imaging method promising

4 hours ago

The new PAMmography method for imaging breast cancer developed by the University of Twente's MIRA research institute and the Medisch Spectrum Twente hospital appears to be a promising new method that could ...

Palliation is rarely a topic in studies on advanced cancer

4 hours ago

End-of-life aspects, the corresponding terminology, and the relevance of palliation in advanced cancer are often not considered in publications on randomized controlled trials (RCTs). This is the result of an analysis by ...

Breast cancer replicates brain development process

5 hours ago

New research led by a scientist at the University of York reveals that a process that forms a key element in the development of the nervous system may also play a pivotal role in the spread of breast cancer.

User comments