Researchers discover molecule that kills cavity causing mouth bacteria

by Bob Yirka report

(Medical Xpress) -- Yale researcher Jose Cordova and Erich Astudillo from the University of Chile (and Founder of Top Tech Innovations SpA) have after working together, discovered a new molecule that kills the bacteria Streptococcus Mutans; long known to be responsible for breaking down sugars in food in the mouth and leaving behind lactic acid which corrodes tooth enamel leading to decay. The new molecule they call Keep 32 (after the 32 teeth in the average human mouth) has been found to kill the bacteria on contact.

The two have applied for a patent on their discovery and have also begun a aimed at both oral care products and makers of food. They say either product if left in the mouth for just 60 seconds will eliminate all the in the mouth and keep them at bay for several hours. If the new molecule passes health and safety tests, the two believe products using their new molecule should be on the market in as little a year and a half. They expect the market for such a product to reach $300 million in just the first year.

The duo have been working together since 2005 using money from the Founder Institute and say the ultimate objective it so license the process for creating the molecule they’ve discovered to big companies like Procter & Gamble, Colgate or even candy companies such as Hershey’s. In interviews with the press in Chile, Astudillo has indicated that the two researchers are already heavily into negotiations with several companies, some of which are interested in buying the outright once it is approved.

Over the years many products have come on the scene with claims of relieving humanity of the plague of , cavities and sometimes the loss of teeth, but other than the introduction of fluoride into drinking water, not much progress has been. If the claims made by this new team proves true however, it could herald a watershed mark in ridding the world of tooth decay as well as helping to improve the health overall for millions as tooth decay and the inflammation that occurs as a result have in recent times been linked to many other health problems throughout the body including heart attacks and even dementia.

More information: translate.google.com/translate… -06-29%2F195432.html

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Claudius
1 / 5 (1) Jul 10, 2012
"...other than the introduction of fluoride into drinking water, not much progress has been." (made?)

Europeans do not generally fluoridate their water, yet their tooth decay rates are essentially the same as in the U.S., so what progress is being mentioned here?
MrGrynch
1 / 5 (1) Jul 10, 2012
What I am concerned about is the possibility of the bacteria developing a resistance. Do we end up with a new super-germ?
Parsec
not rated yet Jul 10, 2012
"...other than the introduction of fluoride into drinking water, not much progress has been." (made?)

Europeans do not generally fluoridate their water, yet their tooth decay rates are essentially the same as in the U.S., so what progress is being mentioned here?

What matters isn't the amount of fluoride added, but rather the total amount of fluoride in the water. Water with naturally high (or even moderate) amounts of fluoride do not need to have it added to get the protective effect.
Claudius
1 / 5 (1) Jul 10, 2012
"What matters isn't the amount of fluoride added, but rather the total amount of fluoride in the water. Water with naturally high (or even moderate) amounts of fluoride do not need to have it added to get the protective effect."

When my first son was born in Germany, he was prescribed fluoride drops by his pediatrician because the water did not have enough fluoride. Just one example, but I doubt that sufficient fluoride is naturally present in European drinking water to explain the lack of difference between U.S. and European tooth decay rates.
Nerdyguy
5 / 5 (1) Jul 10, 2012
The link below provides a concise and on-point (in relation to this conversation) discussion of fluoridated vs. non-fluoridated water. Personally, I was unaware of the general antipathy towards fluoridating water throughout Europe. And yet, Claudius is correct in stating that there is very little evidence that fluoridating water has helped.

However, the relatively modern focus on a) cheap, effective and replaceable toothbrushes, b) toothpaste with fluoride (hell, toothpaste period), c) educating children to brush/floss from an early age, and d) relatively low-cost access to professional dental care surely play a prominent role. None of these were widespread prior to 1950 or so.

http://www.fluori...ion.aspx
Claudius
3 / 5 (2) Jul 10, 2012
@Nerdguy

Thanks for the link. It might also be mentioned that USP Sodium Fluoride is not what is added to drinking water in the U.S., rather it is silicofluorides, waste from the phosphate and uranium mining industries, which would be expensive to deal with if they could not put it in the drinking water.
Cave_Man
3 / 5 (2) Jul 10, 2012
@Nerdguy

Thanks for the link. It might also be mentioned that USP Sodium Fluoride is not what is added to drinking water in the U.S., rather it is silicofluorides, waste from the phosphate and uranium mining industries, which would be expensive to deal with if they could not put it in the drinking water.


At least someone here knows the truth, they only want to get rid of industrial byproducts not help your teeth. When I drink water the water NEVER comes in contact with my teeth. So what the fuck is the point besides poisoning us?

I've heard rumors that they are trying to hinder the production of the pineal gland in your brain which some believe is the literal thrid-eye in hindu belief and is suspected to producing endo-DMT. But that comes from the same conspiracy people who think our military industrial complex has been invaded by extra dimensional aliens...so take with plenty of salt...makes you think though!

Take DMT!
insignificant_fish
not rated yet Jul 11, 2012
@Nerdguy
Take DMT!


__
IronhorseA
not rated yet Jul 11, 2012
@Caveman

The fluoride gets to your teeth internally as well as externally.

Also of note, black tea is good source of fluoride.
R2Bacca
not rated yet Jul 11, 2012
@Caveman

How do you swallow water from a glass without it ever touching your teeth? Do you lack teeth? Do you only drink through straws shoved into the back of your throat?

Just doing a basic experiment with a glass of water on my desk has revealed that significant amounts of water do, in fact, come in contact with my teeth.
Eric_B
not rated yet Jul 11, 2012
"Also of note, black tea is good source of fluoride."

Fluoride is a good source of fluoride poisoning.

There is nothing good about ingesting fucking fluoride, you morons!
Tom_Hennessy
not rated yet Jul 11, 2012
Do they add iron to all your food ?

"High concentration of iron in CF might play an important role in enhancement of growth and virulence of microorganisms of the subgingival plaque and the initiation of active periodontitis."
Claudius
3 / 5 (2) Jul 11, 2012
"Also of note, black tea is good source of fluoride."

Fluoride is a good source of fluoride poisoning.


That's a good reason to avoid drinking black tea.

For those who doubt that fluoride is a poison, just do an internet search for the fluoride material data safety sheet. A man recently died from fluoride poisoning by sleeping in a house being fumigated with fluoride. It is used as rat poison and insecticide. Since it is used on crops, it contaminates the food we eat. It is certainly not something you want to put in your body.

It is really hard justify fluoridation of water (and food) knowing these facts, especially since the data shows that it does not prevent tooth decay, when compared with other countries which do not fluoridate their water supply.

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