Prenatal caffeine intake not linked to children's behavior

Prenatal caffeine intake not linked to children's behavior
Maternal prenatal caffeine intake is not associated with behavior problems in young children, according to a study published online July 9 in Pediatrics.

(HealthDay) -- Maternal prenatal caffeine intake is not associated with behavior problems in young children, according to a study published online July 9 in Pediatrics.

Eva M. Loomans, from Tilburg University in the Netherlands, and colleagues conducted a community-based multiethnic prospective study involving 8,202 women who self-reported their (coffee, caffeinated tea, and cola) around the 16th week of gestation. At age 5 to 6 years, 3,439 children had their behavior assessed by both mother and teacher using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. Analyses were adjusted for a range of confounding variables, including smoking and during pregnancy, maternal age, ethnicity, and education.

The researchers found that there was no correlation between caffeine intake and an increased risk for behavior problems or suboptimal prosocial behavior. There was no evidence of mediation by gestational age or , nor was there effect modification based on the child's gender.

"This study has provided insight into what extent during pregnancy contributes to the development of problem behavior," the authors write. "Our results did not provide evidence to advise pregnant women to reduce their caffeine intake to prevent problem behavior in their children."

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Coffee, caffeine not linked to psoriasis in U.S. women

Mar 21, 2012

(HealthDay) -- Coffee and caffeine are not associated with psoriasis incidence after adjustment for smoking, according to a research letter published in the March issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

Genetic variants associated with caffeine intake identified

Apr 06, 2011

Two genes in which variation affects intake of caffeine, the most widely consumed stimulant in the world, have been discovered. A team of investigators from the National Cancer Institute, Harvard School of Public Health, ...

Recommended for you

Most kids eat fruit, veggies daily: CDC

Jul 16, 2014

(HealthDay)—More than three-quarters of U.S. children eat fruit on any given day, and nearly 92 percent dig into vegetables in a 24-hour period, a new U.S. health survey reveals.

New statement on 'PEG' feeding tubes in children published

Jul 15, 2014

Placement of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube has become an "essential" technique for children and young people with a wide range of problems with feeding and nutrition, according to a position statement in the ...

Bed-sharing linked to SIDS

Jul 14, 2014

(HealthDay)—Risk factors for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) appear to change with the age of the infant, researchers say.

User comments