Adoption of new screening guidelines ups GDM diagnosis

July 20, 2012
Adoption of new screening guidelines ups GDM diagnosis
Implementation of the International Association of Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Group recommendations for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) screening in Israel would increase GDM diagnoses by approximately 50 percent, with risk stratification recommended to reduce over-treatment, according to research published online July 11 in Diabetes Care.

(HealthDay) -- Implementation of the International Association of Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Group (IADPSG) recommendations for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) screening in Israel would increase GDM diagnoses by approximately 50 percent, with risk stratification recommended to reduce over-treatment, according to research published online July 11 in Diabetes Care.

Ofra Kalter-Leibovici, M.D., of the Gertner Institute for Epidemiology and in Tel-Hashomer, Israel, and colleagues analyzed data from 3,345 women participating in the Israeli Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes study to evaluate the regional implications of implementing the IADPSG recommendations for GDM. Adverse outcome rates were calculated and compared for women who were positive according to IADPSG criteria; IADPSG criteria with ; or screening with fasting (FPG) and (BMI).

The researchers found that implementation of the new recommendations in Israel would lead to an increase in the diagnosis of GDM cases by approximately 50 percent. However, one-third of these women could be managed less intensively because of their low risk for adverse outcomes. Similar proportions of adverse outcomes to those seen with IADPSG criteria could be detected with a FPG level ≥89 mg/dL or a BMI of ≥33.5 kg/m² at 28 to 32 weeks of gestation.

"Implementing IADPSG recommendations will substantially increase GDM diagnosis," the authors write. "Risk-stratification in IADPSG-positive women may reduce over-treatment. Screening with FPG or BMI may be a practical alternative."

Explore further: Weight gain between first and second pregnancies increases woman's gestational diabetes risk

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Gestational diabetes, obesity impact pregnancy outcomes

March 2, 2012

(HealthDay) -- Women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) who are obese have significantly higher odds of adverse pregnancy outcomes, according to findings from the multinational Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome ...

High fruit consumption not linked to gestational diabetes

March 29, 2012

(HealthDay) -- Higher consumption of whole fruits prior to pregnancy is not associated with increased risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), and the association between fruit juice consumption and GDM appears to be ...

BMI thresholds for gestational diabetes differ by race

June 1, 2012

(HealthDay) -- There is considerable racial/ethnic variation in the prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) by body mass index (BMI), according to a study published online May 22 in Diabetes Care.

Hemoglobin A1C inadequate for postpartum diabetes screening

June 19, 2012

(HealthDay) -- For postpartum women who have had gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), the hemoglobin A1c (A1C) test criteria alone or in combination with fasting glucose test criteria does not provide sensitive and specific ...

Recommended for you

Diets avoiding dry-cooked foods can protect against diabetes

August 24, 2016

Simple changes in how we cook could go a long way towards preventing diabetes, say researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. A new randomized controlled trial, published online July 29 in the journal Diabetologia, ...

New study reveals a novel protein linked to type 2 diabetes

August 16, 2016

Findings from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), which appear in eLife, provide a possible explanation as to why most people who are obese develop insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. A minority of obese individuals, ...

Gene variant explains differences in diabetes drug response

August 9, 2016

The first results from a large international study of patients taking metformin, the world's most commonly used type 2 diabetes drug, reveal genetic differences among patients that may explain why some respond much better ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.