Self-efficacy predicts fibromyalgia symptomatology

Self-efficacy predicts fibromyalgia symptomatology
Self-efficacy is a significant predictor of fibromyalgia symptomatology, according to a study published online July 17 in Arthritis Care & Research.

(HealthDay) -- Self-efficacy is a significant predictor of fibromyalgia symptomatology, according to a study published online July 17 in Arthritis Care & Research.

Charles Van Liew, from the San Diego State University, and colleagues conducted an autoregressive path analysis to examine the pathways among depression, self-efficacy, pain, and physical functioning in 462 patients (441 women) followed for one year.

The researchers found that, across time, self-efficacy was the only significant predictor of depression, physical functioning, and pain intensity ratings. Self-efficacy at one year was predicted by physical functioning at six months. Within the model, no other factors were significantly associated with self-efficacy.

"Our model suggests a synergistic approach -- specifically, using exercise and therapy combined to have patients experience improvements in functioning while simultaneously reprocessing these improvements and the implications of these improvements for their ability to manage their symptoms," the authors write. "This should enhance feelings of self-efficacy, which should have the greatest, most extensive, and longest lasting benefits for those with fibromyalgia syndrome."

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