Social entrepreneurship for sexual health

July 17, 2012

In this week's PLoS Medicine, Joseph Tucker from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA and colleagues lay out a social entrepreneurship for sexual health (SESH) approach that focuses on decentralized community delivery, multisectoral networks, and horizontal collaboration (business, technology, and academia).

They argue that while SESH approaches have yet to be widely implemented, they show great promise: "Social marketing and sales of point-of-care, community-based tests for HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases, conditional cash transfers to incentivize safe sex, and microenterprise among most-at-risk-populations are all SESH tools that can optimize the delivery of comprehensive sexual ," say the authors.

Explore further: Safer sex: Study examines sexual communication in transgender community

More information: Tucker JD, Fenton KA, Peckham R, Peeling RW (2012) Social Entrepreneurship for Sexual Health (SESH): A New Approach for Enabling Delivery of Sexual Health Services among Most-at-Risk Populations. PLoS Med 9(7): e1001266. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1001266

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