At-home diode laser effective for permanent hair reduction

At-home diode laser effective for permanent hair reduction
Eight treatments with a home-use diode laser provide effective and safe permanent hair reduction one year after the last treatment, according to research published in the September issue of Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

(HealthDay) -- Eight treatments with a home-use diode laser provide effective and safe permanent hair reduction one year after the last treatment, according to research published in the September issue of Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

Ronald G. Wheeland, M.D., of the University of Missouri-Columbia, evaluated the efficacy and safety of a home-use hair removal diode laser in 13 with naturally brown or black hair and Fitzpatrick skin type I to IV. Each participant received eight monthly at-home treatments. Three different fluences of 7, 12, and 20 J/cm² were used and a fourth control area was left untreated.

Wheeland observed significant hair reduction in the treated areas, which generally increased with each treatment and remained stable during follow-up. One month after the last treatment the mean hair count reduction was 47, 55, and 73 percent, respectively, for 7, 12, and 20 J/cm², compared to control; at one year the corresponding reductions were 44, 49, and 65 percent. Overall, 86 percent of patients experienced more than 30 percent hair reduction, and 38 percent had more than 80 percent hair reduction at one year after the last treatment. was complete for 31 percent, and of those who did experience hair regrowth, 69 percent reported hair regrowth to be finer and lighter than before . Mild, transient erythema and edema occurred but usually self-resolved within a few hours.

"The results of this study confirm the effectiveness of this home-use diode laser device in achieving long-term benefits for indicated users concerned with unwanted ," Wheeland concludes.

The author disclosed financial ties to TRIA Beauty Inc., which manufactures the diode used in this study.

More information: Abstract
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