Cellphones AIDS tests studied in S.Africa, S.Korea

South African and South Korean researchers are working on making a smartphone capable of doing AIDS tests in rural parts of Africa that are the worst hit by the disease, a researcher said Friday.

The team have developed a microscope and an application that can photograph and analyse in areas far from laboratories to diagnose HIV and even measure the health of immune systems.

"Our idea was to obtain images and analyse images on this smartphone using applications," said Jung Kyung Kim, a professor in biomedical engineering at Kookmin University in South Korea.

The gadget, called Smartscope, is a small 1-millimeter (0.04-inch) microscope and light which clips over a smartphone's camera.

A standard chip with a blood sample then slides into the gadget in front of the microscope. Next, a special phone programme photographs the sample and analyses the cells.

The team hopes that trials in clinics may start next year, Kim told AFP.

A different prototype developed in the United States takes tests in the field that need to be sent to a computer for analysis.

But the Smartscope will itself be able to do a CD4 cell count—a measure of , which determines when treatment starts.

"Its basic function is to count those for diagnosis," said Kim.

The new technology is destined for in remote communities in South Africa and Swaziland, where clinics often don't have the technology to do these tests effectively.

Almost six million South Africans are infected with HIV, while a quarter of Swazi adults carry the virus.

"In community health is not a gimmick. It becomes an essential part of access," said Professor Jannie Hugo, who heads the family medicine department at the University of Pretoria, the partner in the study.

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Ducknet
not rated yet Aug 31, 2012
Read about LifeSaver and this works with technology too with a proprietary device that can send results to any data base and you can have 7 tests on one stick and it uses markers with an assay and the HIV test would retail for around $13.

If you don't have the reader, you can still test and get results in 2 minutes with a 2 second tongue swab and you also get DNA with this as well, cell phone may not get all of that? My blog post..

http://ducknetweb...erttest-
productsrapid-saliva.html

LifeSaver website..how it can help the the Red Cross and has valuable "social" use with self testing Stiks for alcohol..neat stuff..

http://www.alifes...feSaver/
PPihkala
not rated yet Aug 31, 2012
the HIV test would retail for around $13.

To me it sounds that the smartphone test would be cheaper per patient. Of course it might not be as specific, but $13 can be much money per patient at Africa.