Five CSF markers differentiate dementia, parkinsonism

Five CSF markers differentiate dementia, parkinsonism
Levels of five different cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers are able to improve differentiation between common dementia and parkinsonian disorders, according to a study published online Aug. 27 in the Archives of Neurology.

(HealthDay)—Levels of five different cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers are able to improve differentiation between common dementia and parkinsonian disorders, according to a study published online Aug. 27 in the Archives of Neurology.

Sara Hall, M.D., from Lund University in Sweden, and colleagues assessed the ability of five CSF biomarkers to differentiate between 453 CSF samples from healthy controls and patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), PD with dementia (PDD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), Alzheimer's disease (AD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), multiple system atrophy (MSA), or corticobasal degeneration (CBD).

The researchers found that CSF levels of α-synuclein were increased in patients with AD and decreased in patients with PD, PDD, DLB, and MSA. Decreased levels of β-amyloid 1-42 were seen in DLB. In AD, β-amyloid 1-42 levels were further decreased and CSF levels of total tau and hyperphosphorylated tau were increased. These biomarkers were able to distinguish AD from DLB and PDD with an area under the curve of 0.90, with the main contribution from α-synuclein and total tau. In atypical parkinsonian disorders (PSP, MSA, and CBD), CSF levels of neurofilament light chain were increased, and that level alone could be used to differentiate PD from atypical parkinsonian disorders with an area under the curve of 0.93.

"Together with earlier published data, our results indicate that these five CSF might have clinical value in the differential diagnosis of and/or parkinsonism," Hall and colleagues conclude.

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

New ALS associated gene identified using innovative strategy

15 hours ago

Using an innovative exome sequencing strategy, a team of international scientists led by John Landers, PhD, at the University of Massachusetts Medical School has shown that TUBA4A, the gene encoding the Tubulin Alpha 4A protein, ...

Can bariatric surgery lead to severe headache?

15 hours ago

Bariatric surgery may be a risk factor for a condition that causes severe headaches, according to a study published in the October 22, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurol ...

Bipolar disorder discovery at the nano level

16 hours ago

A nano-sized discovery by Northwestern Medicine scientists helps explain how bipolar disorder affects the brain and could one day lead to new drug therapies to treat the mental illness.

Brain simulation raises questions

19 hours ago

What does it mean to simulate the human brain? Why is it important to do so? And is it even possible to simulate the brain separately from the body it exists in? These questions are discussed in a new paper ...

User comments