Cuba declares cholera outbreak over

August 28, 2012

Cuba's health ministry said Tuesday the country's first cholera outbreak in 130 years is over after three deaths and more than 400 confirmed cases.

"More than 10 days have gone by since the last confirmed case, so the is declaring this (cholera) outbreak over," a ministry statement said.

All told there were 417 confirmed cases in two months since the outbreak was announced July 3, according to the the ministry, which said the cases were linked to contaminated wells in Manzanillo.

Some dissidents in the Americas' only communist-run country have criticized the government for withholding information about the outbreak.

"If anger (against the government) is dangerous, cholera without information transparency is worse," dissident blogger Yoani Sanchez tweeted last month.

Health officials have said they believe and hot temperatures contributed to the outbreak.

Cholera is an intestinal ailment spread through and water.

It causes serious diarrhea and vomiting, leading to dehydration. It is easily treatable by and antibiotics, but the ailment can be fatal if not addressed quickly enough.

The outbreak is a matter of particular concern in Cuba, which prides itself on having one of the region's most admired public health systems, seen as a laudable success for the half-century old regime.

The last known person to be infected with cholera in Cuba died of the disease in 1882, when the island was still a Spanish colony.

Explore further: Cuba's first cholera outbreak in 130 years kills three

Related Stories

No new cholera deaths in Cuba

July 14, 2012

(AP) — Cuba's Health Ministry on Saturday reported 158 cases of cholera, nearly three times as many as previously disclosed, but said there were no new deaths and the outbreak appears to have been contained and on the ...

Recommended for you

Zika virus infection alters human and viral RNA

October 20, 2016

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have discovered that Zika virus infection leads to modifications of both viral and human genetic material. These modifications—chemical tags known as ...

Food-poisoning bacteria may be behind Crohn's disease

October 19, 2016

People who retain a particular bacterium in their gut after a bout of food poisoning may be at an increased risk of developing Crohn's disease later in life, according to a new study led by researchers at McMaster University.

Neurodevelopmental model of Zika may provide rapid answers

October 19, 2016

A newly published study from researchers working in collaboration with the Regenerative Bioscience Center at the University of Georgia demonstrates fetal death and brain damage in early chick embryos similar to microcephaly—a ...

Scientists uncover new facets of Zika-related birth defects

October 17, 2016

In a study that could one day help eliminate the tragic birth defects caused by Zika virus, scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have elucidated how the virus attacks the brains of newborns, ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.