Good transplant outcomes in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

(HealthDay) -- Post-heart transplant survival does not differ significantly between patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) and those with other types of heart disease, according to a study published in the Aug. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

To elucidate the post-transplant prognosis for patients with HC, Tomoko S. Kato, M.D., Ph.D., from Columbia University in New York City, and colleagues retrospectively reviewed 813 consecutive undergoing from 1999 to 2010. The clinical course was compared for 41 patients with idiopathic HC, 373 patients with ischemic heart disease, and 398 patients with other heart disease.

The researchers found that the HC patients were significantly younger than those with ischemic heart disease (47.8 ± 14.0 versus 57.1 ± 9.4 years). Compared with patients with ischemic heart disease or other heart disease, a significantly lower proportion of patients with HC underwent ventricular assist device surgery for bridge-to-transplant (14.6 percent versus 31.1 and 35.7 percent, respectively). Patients with HC had better post-transplant survival than that those with ischemic heart disease at one and five years (P = 0.0359), although survival did not differ significantly from those with other heart disease. Reduced post-transplant survival was seen for those with HC on univariate, but not multivariate, analyses. Most patients with HC had non-dilated left ventricles, and post-transplant survival was similar for those with dilated and non-dilated left ventricles.

"In conclusion, the post-transplant survival of those with HC did not differ from those of the subjects who underwent transplant for other non-HC indications," the authors write.

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Heart transplant patients at risk for serious skin cancers

Jun 30, 2011

A new study published in the American Journal of Transplantation reveals that there is a significant risk of serious skin cancers, including cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma, in heart transplant patients.

Recommended for you

Humiliation tops list of mistreatment toward med students

10 hours ago

Each year thousands of students enroll in medical schools across the country. But just how many feel they've been disrespected, publicly humiliated, ridiculed or even harassed by their superiors at some point during their ...

Surrogate offers clues into man with 16 babies

18 hours ago

When the young Thai woman saw an online ad seeking surrogate mothers, it seemed like a life-altering deal: $10,000 to help a foreign couple that wanted a child but couldn't conceive.

Nurses go on strike in Ebola-hit Liberia

18 hours ago

Nurses at Liberia's largest hospital went on strike on Monday, demanding better pay and equipment to protect them against a deadly Ebola epidemic which has killed hundreds in the west African nation.

ALS Ice Bucket Challenge arrives in North Korea

Aug 31, 2014

It's pretty hard to find a novel way to do the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge by now, but two-time Grammy-winning rapper Pras Michel, a founding member of the Fugees, has done it—getting his dousing in the center ...

Cold cash just keeps washing in from ALS challenge

Aug 28, 2014

In the couple of hours it took an official from the ALS Association to return a reporter's call for comment, the group's ubiquitous "ice bucket challenge" had brought in a few million more dollars.

User comments