Multidisciplinary approach cuts symptoms of fibromyalgia

Multidisciplinary approach cuts symptoms of fibromyalgia
Multidisciplinary treatment adapted for women with low educational levels is superior to conventional pharmacotherapy in reducing key symptoms of fibromyalgia, including sleep disturbances, catastrophizing, and psychological distress, according to research published online Aug. 16 in Arthritis Care & Research.

(HealthDay)—Multidisciplinary treatment adapted for women with low educational levels is superior to conventional pharmacotherapy in reducing key symptoms of fibromyalgia (FM), including sleep disturbances, catastrophizing, and psychological distress, according to research published online Aug. 16 in Arthritis Care & Research.

Antoni Castel, of the University Hospital of Tarragona Joan XXIII in Spain, and colleagues conducted a randomized controlled trial of 155 women between the ages of 18 and 60 years with a diagnosis of FM to evaluate the efficacy of multidisciplinary treatment adapted for patients with low educational levels and to determine the durability of therapeutic benefit. One group received conventional pharmacologic treatment and the other group received multidisciplinary treatment, including pharmacologic treatment, education, physical therapy, and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT).

The researchers found that, compared with the group receiving conventional , statistically significant improvement was noted in women in the multidisciplinary treatment group. Furthermore, the improvements in sleep disturbance, catastrophizing, and were maintained one year after treatment had ended.

"In conclusion, a multidisciplinary treatment program for FM that combines pharmacological treatment, education, physical therapy and CBT (the contents of which have been adapted for patients with low educational levels and applied in a group format in a non-hospital environment) has demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of the key symptoms of FM and the long-term maintenance of these improvements," the authors write.

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Osteoarthritis patients will benefit from jumping exercise

Feb 18, 2015

Progressive high-impact training improved the patellar cartilage quality of the postmenopausal women who may be at risk of osteoporosis (bone loss) as well as at risk of osteoarthritis. This was found out in the study carry ...

Use of nondrug, nonsurgical options low in hip, knee OA

Feb 16, 2015

(HealthDay)—Usage of nondrug, nonoperative interventions in community-dwelling individuals with hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) is low, according to research published in the February issue of Arthritis Ca ...

Prevalence of fibromyalgia varies with criteria applied

Feb 13, 2015

(HealthDay)—The prevalence of fibromyalgia varies with the different sets of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) classification criteria, according to a study published in the February issue of Arthritis & ...

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.