Most parents think social media not a bad thing: survey

Most parents think social media not a bad thing: survey
Many believe it prepares their kids for future work world, broadens their thinking.

(HealthDay) -- A new survey finds that an overwhelming majority of parents think social media isn't necessarily a bad thing for their children.

Eighty-three percent of the parents questioned said the benefits are either equal to or outweigh the risks, according to Children's Mercy Hospitals and Clinics of Kansas City, Mo., which commissioned the survey.

The survey also finds that:

  • Of the parents surveyed, 72 percent said it's good preparation for future involvement in a technology-dependent work world for their kids to participate in social networking.
  • Roughly 57 percent thought helps kids be more open-minded, creative and worldly, while 59 percent believed it would help them work with others.
  • More than two-thirds of parents said children should be 13 or older to join Facebook. About two-thirds of parents with kids aged 12 or younger said they were worried about "sexting" or other as a result of social media; the number dropped to fewer than half for parents of kids aged 13 to 19.
  • Parents of younger kids were more worried than the parents of teenagers about cyber bullying, depression, and other problems.
The , conducted in June, included a national sample of 728 parents.

More information: For more about bullying, try the U.S. National Library of Medicine.


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