Skin intrinsic fluorescence tied to coronary artery disease

Skin intrinsic fluorescence tied to coronary artery disease
Skin intrinsic fluorescence is significantly associated with coronary artery disease in middle-aged adults with a long duration of type 1 diabetes, according to a study published online July 30 in Diabetes Care.

(HealthDay) -- Skin intrinsic fluorescence (SIF) is significantly associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) in middle-aged adults with a long duration of type 1 diabetes, according to a study published online July 30 in Diabetes Care.

Baqiyyah N. Conway, Ph.D., of Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn., and colleagues conducted a study involving a total of 172 middle-aged adults with type 1 diabetes (mean disease duration, 36 years) to evaluate the relationship between SIF and CAD and whether this relationship was independent of renal disease.

The researchers found that 30 of the participants had CAD, and that SIF levels were significantly higher in those participants with CAD. SIF correlated strongly with CAD (odds ratio [OR], 3.5). The correlation persisted, after adjustment for age, diabetes duration, and cumulative glycemic exposure (OR, 2.4), and was stronger for men (OR, 5.6) than for women (OR, 1.4; 95 percent confidence interval [CI], 0.61 to 3.3). With inclusion of nephropathy in the model, the OR for SIF declined to 1.7 (95 percent CI, 0.89 to 3.4).

"In conclusion, we have demonstrated a strong association between SIF and CAD in middle-aged individuals with ," the authors write. "SIF partially reflects the influence of skin advanced glycation end products, skin markers of oxidative stress and , subject age, diabetes duration, long-term glycemic control, and renal disease, which are associated with increased CAD risk."

Several authors are employees of or disclosed to Vera Light Inc., which funded the study and manufactures the SCOUT DS used to determine SIF.

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

BPA exposure possibly linked to future heart disease

Feb 29, 2012

(HealthDay) -- Healthy people exposed to higher levels of the controversial chemical bisphenol A (BPA), found in plastics, may be more likely to develop heart disease, according to a study published online ...

Nonsupportive family members sabotage diabetes self-Care

May 02, 2012

(HealthDay) -- Diabetes patients with nonsupportive family members are less adherent to their diabetes medication regimen and have worse glycemic control, according to a study published online April 26 in ...

Recommended for you

Screening for diabetes at dental visits using oral blood

Feb 26, 2015

It is estimated that 8.1 million of the 29.1 million Americans living with diabetes are undiagnosed and many who have diabetes have poor glycemic control. Given that each year many Americans visit a dental provider but not ...

CBT, sertraline insufficient in diabetes and depression

Feb 26, 2015

(HealthDay)—For patients with diabetes and depression, improvements in depression are seen with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) or sertraline, with a significant advantage for sertraline, but glycemic ...

Early signs in young children predict type 1 diabetes

Feb 26, 2015

New research shows that it is possible to predict the development of type 1 diabetes. By measuring the presence of autoantibodies in the blood, it is possible to detect whether the immune system has begun to break down the ...

Daily menu plan reduces blood sugar significantly

Feb 25, 2015

A large group of people with diabetes who followed a menu plan created by University of Alberta nutrition researchers for just three months significantly reduced their blood sugar levels.

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.