Integration of active tuberculosis case finding in a mobile HIV-testing clinic is feasible

A research article by Katharina Kranzer from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and colleagues describe the feasibility and costs of an active tuberculosis case finding project in Cape Town, South Africa.

The study describes the integration of tuberculosis testing into a mobile HIV testing service for HIV-negative individuals with symptoms suggestive of tuberculosis and all HIV-positive individuals.

The mobile testing clinic, named the Tutu Tester after Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu, visits underserviced areas in greater Cape Town and provides testing services for deprived communities.

The study demonstrates that active tuberculosis case finding in settings with a high burden of HIV and tuberculosis is feasible and has a high uptake, yield, and treatment success. However, the authors note that further work is required to determine whether mobile case finding is cost-effective and whether the service can be scaled up.

More information: Kranzer K, Lawn SD, Meyer-Rath G, Vassall A, Raditlhalo E, et al. (2012) Feasibility, Yield, and Cost of Active Tuberculosis Case Finding Linked to a Mobile HIV Service in Cape Town, South Africa: A Cross-sectional Study. PLoS Med 9(8): e1001281. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1001281

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