Watch-and-wait OK in low-tumor burden follicular lymphoma

Watch and wait OK in low-tumor burden follicular lymphoma
An initial watch-and-wait strategy does not have a detrimental effect on the freedom from treatment failure or overall survival rate in selected patients with low-tumor burden follicular lymphoma compared with patients initially treated with rituximab-containing regimens, according to research published online Sept. 24 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

(HealthDay)—An initial watch-and-wait strategy does not have a detrimental effect on the freedom from treatment failure (FFTF) or overall survival rate in selected patients with low-tumor burden follicular lymphoma compared with patients initially treated with rituximab-containing regimens, according to research published online Sept. 24 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Philippe Solal-Céligny, M.D., Ph.D., of the Institut de Cancérologie de l'Ouest in Saint Herblain, France, and colleagues conducted a involving 120 patients with treatment-naive follicular lymphoma who were initially managed expectantly and 107 comparator patients. The majority of patients (80 percent) had a low tumor burden and disseminated disease.

Treatment was initiated in half of the patients after a median follow-up period of 64 months. After adjusting for potential confounders, the researchers found that patients with more than four nodal areas affected were 2.32-fold more likely to have a shorter time to initiation. Overall, watch-and-wait patients had a four-year FFTF rate of 79 percent, compared with 69 percent for those who were initially treated with a rituximab-containing regimen.

"Our data in a prospective and well-analyzed database that reflects actual practice suggest that there is no difference in outcome between patients who were observed and patients who were treated initially," the authors write. "Our cohort study provides additional information relevant to the important issue of management of patients with follicular lymphoma in the current era and suggests that observation remains an appropriate approach in asymptomatic patients with low-tumor burden ."

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

R-CHOP benefits older mantle-cell lymphoma patients

Aug 09, 2012

(HealthDay) -- In older patients with mantle-cell lymphoma, a rituximab-based chemotherapy regimen (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone [R-CHOP]) followed by maintenance ...

Recommended for you

Cancer: Tumors absorb sugar for mobility

3 hours ago

Cancer cells are gluttons. We have long known that they monopolize large amounts of sugar. More recently, it became clear that some tumor cells are also characterized by a series of features such as mobility or unlikeliness ...

Early hormone therapy may be safe for women's hearts

12 hours ago

(HealthDay)—Healthy women at low risk of cardiovascular disease may be able to take hormone replacement therapy soon after menopause for a short time without harming their hearts, according to a new study.

Low yield for repeat colonoscopy in some patients

13 hours ago

(HealthDay)—Repeat colonoscopies within 10 years are of little benefit to patients who had no polyps found on adequate examination; however, repeat colonoscopies do benefit patients when the baseline examination was compromised, ...

Cell's recycling center implicated in division decisions

16 hours ago

Most cells do not divide unless there is enough oxygen present to support their offspring, but certain cancer cells and other cell types circumvent this rule. Researchers at The Johns Hopkins University have now identified ...

User comments