9/11 WTC health program adds 50 types of cancer

(AP)—The federal government will include about 50 types of cancer on the list of Sept. 11 World Trade Center-related illnesses covered by a program to pay for health coverage.

Democratic New York Sens. Kirsten Gillibrand (KEHR'-sten JIHL'-uh-brand) and Charles Schumer and the National Institute for announced the change Monday. The institute said last June it favored expanding the $4.3 billion health program to include cancer.

Scientists say there's little research to prove exposure to from the destroyed twin towers caused even one kind of cancer. Questions about whether dust caused cancer were a reason Congress didn't include it in the initial list of covered illnesses.

But an advisory panel said it was plausible first responders and others who were exposed to the toxic dust might get cancer.

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

US wants 9/11 health program to include 50 cancers

Jun 08, 2012

(AP) — First responders and New York-area residents who were stricken with cancer after being exposed to the toxic ash that exploded over Manhattan when the World Trade Center collapsed would qualify for free treatment ...

US lawmakers move to help stricken 9/11 workers

Dec 23, 2010

The US Congress voted Wednesday to create a 10-year, four-billion-dollar program to help September 11 emergency workers sickened in the ruins of the worst terrorist attack on US soil.

Tough choice looms on 9/11 health lawsuits

Dec 26, 2011

(AP) -- More than 1,600 people who filed lawsuits claiming that their health was ruined by dust and smoke from the collapsed World Trade Center must decide by Jan. 2 whether to keep fighting in court, or ...

Recommended for you

Poland bans junk food in schools

8 minutes ago

Poland on Thursday banned junk food in schools from January next year to trim rising rates of childhood obesity.

Vaccination for nicotine addiction being developed

18 minutes ago

A Virginia Tech professor is working on a vaccine that could help smokers conquer their nicotine addiction, making many smoking-related diseases and deaths relics of the 21st century.

Initiative to emphasize concussions are treatable

2 hours ago

At a time when the national concussion conversation instills fear and uncertainty among parents and athletes at all levels, the UPMC Sports Medicine Concussion Program is working to change the current discussion where two ...

England's NHS appeals for more government funds

3 hours ago

Leaders of England's state-funded National Health Service (NHS) warned on Thursday that billions of pounds in extra funds were needed to maintain patient care, laying down the gauntlet to politicians ahead of May's general ...

User comments