2nd firm agrees to temporary shutdown in outbreak

by Jay Lindsay
This photo provided Oct. 9, 2012, by the Minnesota Department of Health shows shows vials of the injectable steroid product made by New England Compounding Center implicated in a fungal meningitis outbreak that were being shipped to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta from Minneapolis. About 17,700 single-dose vials of the steroid sent to 23 states have been recalled. The outbreak involves 10 states, including Minnesota. (AP Photo/Minnesota Department of Health)

(AP)—A Massachusetts company run by the same executives who operated a specialty pharmacy linked to a fatal meningitis outbreak has agreed to temporarily shut down for inspection by state and federal regulators.

Ameridose is located in Westborough, Mass. The Compounding Center, which produced a steroid linked to the outbreak, is in Framingham. Both firms are run by Barry Cadden and Greg Conigliaro.

Ameridose provides sterile medication in prefilled oral syringes to about 3,000 hospitals nationwide. It opened its doors in 2006, eight years after NECC opened.

The Massachusetts Department of Public Health says Ameridose agreed to the shutdown until inspections by and the U.S. are completed.

There is no recall of Ameridose products.

The outbreak has sickened 137 people in 10 states. Twelve have died.

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