Abraxane approved to treat advanced lung cancer

Abraxane approved to treat advanced lung cancer

(HealthDay)—Abraxane (paclitaxel protein-bound) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration—in combination with the drug carboplatin—to treat advanced or spreading non-small cell lung cancer among people who aren't candidates for surgery or radiation therapy, the agency said Friday.

Abraxane was first approved in 2005 to treat breast cancer.

In a new clinical study of 1,038 people, the most common adverse reactions to the drug were anemia, loss of hair, nausea, fatigue, loss of appetite, irregularity, rash, and swelling.

Abraxane is produced by Celgene Corp., based in Summit, N.J.

More information: For more information about non-small cell lung cancer, visit the U.S. National Cancer Institute.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Afinitor approved for advanced breast cancer

Jul 23, 2012

(HealthDay) -- Afinitor (everolimus) has been approved in combination with the drug exemestane to treat postmenopausal women with advanced hormone-receptor positive, HER2-negative breast cancer, the U.S. Food ...

Perjeta approved for advanced breast cancer

Jun 11, 2012

(HealthDay) -- Perjeta (pertuzumab) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat people with HER2-positive late-stage breast cancer, the agency said in a news release.

Zaltrap approved for advanced colorectal cancer

Aug 04, 2012

(HealthDay) -- Zaltrap (ziv-afilbercept) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in combination with a FOLFIRI chemotherapy regimen for adults with advanced metastatic (spreading) colorectal cancer, the ...

Recommended for you

Survival differences seen for advanced-stage laryngeal cancer

12 hours ago

The five-year survival rate for advanced-stage laryngeal cancer was higher than national levels in a small study at a single academic center performing a high rate of surgical therapy, including a total laryngectomy (removal ...

Gene test aids cancer profile

22 hours ago

The first round of chemotherapy did little to suppress Ron Bose's leukemia. The second round, with 10 times the dose, knocked the proliferating blast cells down, but only by half.

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.