Cardiovascular IED infections have distinct features, outcomes

October 14, 2012
Cardiovascular IED infections have distinct features, outcomes
Cardiovascular implantable electronic device infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci have distinct clinical features and outcomes, according to research published in the Oct. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

(HealthDay)—Cardiovascular implantable electronic device (CIED) infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) have distinct clinical features and outcomes, according to research published in the Oct. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Katherine Y. Le, M.D., M.P.H., from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and colleagues retrospectively reviewed all cases of CIED infection seen at the Mayo Clinic from 1991 through 2008 to assess device and , clinical features, and patient outcomes.

Of the 280 cases of staphylococcal CIED infections, the researchers found that 43.9 percent were due to S. aureus and 56.0 percent were attributable to CoNS. Initially implanted devices were more frequently affected by S. aureus CIED infection. Corticosteroid therapy, hemodialysis, implanted catheters, prosthetic valves, and remote sources of bacteremia were associated with late S. aureus CIED infection cases as opposed to late CoNS cases. Compared with CoNS endovascular infections, cases of S. aureus endovascular infections had significantly longer duration of bacteremia (56.0 versus 20.3 percent ≥3 days), longer hospitalization (37.4 versus 15.2 percent >20 days), and increased mortality (25.2 versus 9.5 percent). A history of multiple device revisions and a higher number of total and abandoned leads at presentation were significantly associated with CoNS CIED infections versus S. aureus.

"In conclusion, CIED infections due to S. aureus and CoNS have distinct clinical features and outcomes," the authors write.

Explore further: Cardiovascular implantable electronic device-related infections linked with increased risk of death

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Staph sepsis increases mortality in preterm infants

March 12, 2012

(HealthDay) -- Only about 1 percent of very low birth weight (VLBW) infants develop methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections, and the morbidity and mortality are similar to that seen in infants with methicillin-susceptible ...

MRSA skin infections up, linked to furunculosis

July 27, 2012

(HealthDay) -- The incidence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) in the United States is increasing and is associated with follicular infection, most commonly folliculitis followed ...

Recommended for you

Researchers mine Twitter for cardiovascular disease research

September 28, 2016

For years, marketers and other commercial data-miners have been using Twitter's vast database of "tweets" to gauge consumer attitudes and track events. Now medical researchers are getting in on the trend. Researchers from ...

Smoking leaves lasting marks on DNA, study finds

September 20, 2016

(HealthDay)—Smoking cigarettes can leave a lasting imprint on human DNA, altering more than 7,000 genes in ways that may contribute to the development of smoking-related diseases, a new study says.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.