Chinese herbs show promise for lung cancer, flu, and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

Chinese herbs, including JHQG, BFXL, and BFHX, may show significant benefits for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), and influenza.

In three separate studies, researchers from China Academy of Chinese Medical Science in Beijing analyzed the health benefits of on patients with NSCLC, IPF, and seasonal influenza.

Researchers found that JHQG helped to prolong survival in patients with metastatic NSCLC compared with patients receiving standard care; was safe and effective in the management of IPF and could also help improve patients' quality of life and activity capacity; and helped to reduce fever in patients with influenza compared with placebo.

Researchers conclude that Chinese herbs could be used as an alternative treatment for the aforementioned conditions.

This study was presented during CHEST 2012, the annual meeting of the , held October 20 – 25, in Atlanta, Georgia.

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