Effective treatment helps Danes with personality disorders

October 23, 2012

For seven years, Carsten René Jørgensen from the Department of Psychology and Behavioural Sciences at Aarhus University has collaborated with the Clinic for Personality Disorders, Aarhus University Hospital, Risskov on examining the extent to which modern psychoanalytic psychotherapy can help the Danes suffering from severe borderline personality disorders.

Among the first to examine these forms of modern psychoanalytic treatment of severe , the study shows a clear trend; a vast majority of patients do better after a two-year course of treatment.

- It is a patient population that has not been accustomed to receiving much treatment because it is a difficult group, and it has therefore been interesting to examine the effect of more intensive treatment, says Carsten René Jørgensen.

The study compares two forms of treatment. Supportive treatment with group therapy every two weeks and more with weekly sessions involving both and individual psychotherapy. Both forms of treatment are based on modern psychoanalytic principles.

To the researchers' surprise, both treatments proved highly effective. However, a distinctive feature of the intensive treatment was that patients in this group achieved a higher functional level, which probably indicates that they are more likely to gain a foothold in the .

From public support to the labour market

Borderline personality disorders are among the more serious personality disorders where patients have difficulty dealing with and they often experience pronounced fluctuations in their emotions and self-perception. Patients may also be self-harming and have a highly increased risk of abuse and , among other things.

That is also the reason why up to 80% of these patients are publicly supported. The research results indicate, however, that the modern psychoanalytic psychotherapy may be part of the solution to get some of the patients closer to the labour market and self-reliance.

- These are people who suffer greatly, but this treatment helps them to feel better, see their strengths and weaknesses more clearly and become better at handling relations. They will better equip them to start, for example, an education or part-time work, explains Carsten René Jørgensen.

From a socioeconomic point of view it may therefore be beneficial to treat this patient group. Carsten René Jørgensen explains that although the treatment itself requires extensive resources, studies have shown that the socioeconomic savings by offering treatment are higher because the cost of emergency room visits, hospitalisations, local initiatives, benefits and other forms of treatment are reduced.

Explore further: PTSD psychotherapy is enhanced with D-cycloserine

Related Stories

PTSD psychotherapy is enhanced with D-cycloserine

June 4, 2012

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is among the most common, distressing, and disabling medical consequences of combat or other extremely stressful life events. The first-line treatment for PTSD is exposure therapy, a type ...

Recommended for you

How to reduce US firearm suicide rates?

July 28, 2016

Researchers from Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) and New York State Psychiatric Institute (NYSPI) have found that legislation reducing access to firearms has lowered firearm suicide rates in other countries. This ...

Music makes beer taste better

July 28, 2016

Music can influence how much you like the taste of beer, according to a study published in Frontiers in Psychology.

Smartphone exercises for a better mood

July 28, 2016

Brief, directed smartphone exercises can help quickly improve our mood. This is the latest finding from psychologists at the University of Basel and their international colleagues, reported in the journal Frontiers in Psychology.

Resistance to antidepressants linked to metabolism

July 25, 2016

Often, clinical depression has company; it shows up in the brain alongside metabolic abnormalities, such as elevated blood sugar, in the body. While studying an experimental antidepressant in rats, Rockefeller University ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.