Excessive daytime sleepiness common in high school students

New research shows that high school students experience excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), with most students sleeping fewer than 7 hours per night.

Researchers from West Virginia University surveyed 141 , of which 28.4% were either obese or overweight.

Overall, 39% of the students surveyed experienced EDS with an Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) of >10, and were more likely to report perception of inadequate or nonrefreshing sleep than those with ESS < 10.

However, the duration of sleep was less than 7 hours per night in both groups.

There was no difference in the incidence of obesity or overweight, snoring, or number of hours per week spent performing physical activity, engaging in videogames, or watching television in students with ESS of <10 or >10.

Researchers conclude that the lack of association between EDS and duration of sleep suggests a sleep disorder may be present in high school students.

This study was presented during CHEST 2012, the annual meeting of the , held October 20 – 25, in Atlanta, Georgia.

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