Experts list many ways funguses can taint drugs

October 16, 2012 by Mike Stobbe

(AP)—Experts say there are many ways funguses could have gotten inside the Massachusetts pharmacy at the center of the deadly U.S. outbreak of fungal meningitis.

Dirty conditions at the pharmacy, faulty sterilizing equipment, tainted ingredients or careless lab technicians could have led to contamination of the steroid medication blamed for the outbreak.

are still investigating, and the New England Compounding Center of Framingham, Massachusetts, has not commented on what might have gone wrong, so outside experts can only speculate.

The outbreak has killed at least 15 people and sickened more than 200 others in 15 states. Nearly all had received for back pain.

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Tom_Hennessy
1 / 5 (2) Oct 16, 2012
I read they use that very fungus ,Exserohilum , to 'speed up' production of a batch of drugs ? It could be they never cleared the fungus from the situation before selling the drug ?

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