Feds seek full court review of cigarette warnings

by Michael Felberbaum

(AP)—The U.S. government is asking a federal appeals court to rehear a challenge to a requirement that tobacco companies to put large graphic health warnings on cigarette packages.

A three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington in August affirmed a lower court ruling blocking the requirement.

The Justice Department filed a petition Tuesday asking for the full court to rehear the case. The court rarely grants such appeals.

Some of the nation's largest tobacco companies sued to block the mandate to include warnings to show the dangers of smoking and encourage smokers to quit lighting up.

They argued that the proposed warnings went beyond factual information into anti-smoking advocacy. The government argued the photos of dead and diseased smokers are factual.

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Court upholds block on graphic cigarette warnings

Aug 24, 2012

(AP)—An appeals court on Friday upheld a decision barring the U.S. government from requiring tobacco companies to put large graphic health warnings on cigarette packages to show that smoking can disfigure and even kill.

Judge blocks plan for graphic cigarette warnings

Mar 01, 2012

(HealthDay) -- A federal judge on Wednesday blocked implementation of an FDA mandate that would have forced tobacco companies to place graphic anti-smoking images on packages of cigarettes.

Recommended for you

Tracking spending among the commercially insured

10 hours ago

Recent growth in health care spending for commercially insured individuals is due primarily to increases in prices for medical services, rather than increased use, according to a new study led by researchers at The Dartmouth ...

Taking aim at added sugars to improve Americans' health

14 hours ago

Now that health advocates' campaigns against trans-fats have largely succeeded in sidelining the use of the additive, they're taking aim at sugar for its potential contributions to Americans' health conditions. But scientists ...

User comments