Fluoro-less ureteral stent placement deemed feasible

October 15, 2012
Fluoro-less ureteral stent placement deemed feasible
The placement of ureteral stents following uncomplicated ureteroscopic stone removal, without fluoroscopy for image guidance, is feasible and has comparable accuracy and complication rates to that of conventional ureteral stent placement with fluoroscopy, according to research published online in the October issue of Urology.

(HealthDay)—The placement of ureteral stents following uncomplicated ureteroscopic stone removal, without fluoroscopy for image guidance, is feasible and has comparable accuracy and complication rates to that of conventional ureteral stent placement with fluoroscopy, according to research published online in the October issue of Urology.

Wayne Brisbane, of the Loma Linda University School of Medicine in California, and colleagues conducted a retrospective review to compare the outcomes for 25 patients who underwent fluoro-less stent placement and 25 patients who underwent conventional stent placement with fluoroscopy.

The researchers found that all 25 fluoro-less stent placements were performed successfully. Grade 1 placement was achieved in 76 and 64 percent of the fluoro-less placement group and the conventional group, respectively. However, this difference did not achieve . No significant differences were observed between the groups in complication rates.

"Ureteral stent placement without fluoroscopic guidance is feasible. It maintains comparable efficacy and complication rates with conventional ureteral stent placement," the authors write. "This technique allows reduced in patients requiring ureteral stent placement."

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Molecular Zika study finds possible target for tests, drugs

April 19, 2016

The molecular structure of the Zika virus as seen on x-ray crystallography revealed electrostatic differences in a key protein compared with other flaviviruses that might explain how it infects human cells, according to a ...

Zika virus may now be tied to another brain disease

April 10, 2016

The Zika virus may be associated with an autoimmune disorder that attacks the brain's myelin similar to multiple sclerosis, according to a small study that is being released today and will be presented at the American Academy ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.