More intensive chemo ups survival in ewing sarcoma

(HealthDay)—More intensive chemotherapy (every two weeks versus every three weeks) improves event-free survival for patients with localized Ewing sarcoma, according to a study published online Oct. 22 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Richard B. Womer, M.D., from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, and colleagues conducted a prospective trial in which 568 patients younger than 50 years old with newly diagnosed localized extradural Ewing sarcoma were randomized to receive standard or intensified treatment with chemotherapy cycles beginning every 21 and 14 days, respectively (284 patients in each group). Patients received vincristine, , and alternating with ifosfamide and etoposide for 14 cycles, with filgrastim between cycles. At week 13, following four cycles in the standard arm and six cycles in the intensified arm, primary tumor treatment (surgery, radiation, or both) began.

The researchers found that, at a median of five years, event-free survival was 65 percent in the standard arm and 73 percent in the intensified arm (P = 0.048). Toxicity was similar between the groups.

"For localized Ewing sarcoma, chemotherapy administered every two weeks is more effective than administered every three weeks, with no increase in toxicity," the authors write.

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Generation of tanners see spike in deadly melanoma

10 hours ago

(AP)—Stop sunbathing and using indoor tanning beds, the acting U.S. surgeon general warned in a report released Tuesday that cites an alarming 200 percent jump in deadly melanoma cases since 1973.

Penn team makes cancer glow to improve surgical outcomes

10 hours ago

The best way to cure most cases of cancer is to surgically remove the tumor. The Achilles heel of this approach, however, is that the surgeon may fail to extract the entire tumor, leading to a local recurrence.

Cancer: Tumors absorb sugar for mobility

22 hours ago

Cancer cells are gluttons. We have long known that they monopolize large amounts of sugar. More recently, it became clear that some tumor cells are also characterized by a series of features such as mobility or unlikeliness ...

User comments