Interventions helpful for breast cancer-induced menopause

Interventions helpful for breast cancer-induced menopause
Cognitive behavioral therapy and physical exercise improve endocrine and urinary symptoms as well as physical functioning in patients with breast cancer treatment-induced menopause, according to research published online Oct. 8 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

(HealthDay)—Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and physical exercise improve endocrine and urinary symptoms as well as physical functioning in patients with breast cancer treatment-induced menopause, according to research published online Oct. 8 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Saskia F.A. Duijts, Ph.D., of the Netherlands Cancer Institute in Amsterdam, and colleagues conducted a randomized, controlled, multicenter study involving 422 patients with breast cancer to determine the efficacy of using CBT and physical exercise to alleviate treatment-induced menopausal symptoms. A total of 109 women were assigned to CBT, 104 to physical exercise, 106 to CBT and physical exercise, and 103 were a wait-list control group.

The researchers found that patients in the intervention groups had significantly reduced levels of endocrine and urinary symptoms compared with control patients, as well as improved physical functioning. The perceived burden of hot flashes and night sweats and sexual activity were significantly lower in those groups receiving CBT. These effects occurred by the 12-week follow-up as well as the six-month follow-up.

"In conclusion, our findings indicate that both CBT and can have salutary effects on menopausal symptoms and to a lesser degree on sexuality and health-related quality-of-life-related functioning among patients with breast cancer experiencing treatment-induced menopause," the authors write. "Future work is needed to improve the design and the planning of these interventions, with an eye toward improving program adherence."

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Related Stories

Multidisciplinary approach cuts symptoms of fibromyalgia

date Aug 26, 2012

(HealthDay)—Multidisciplinary treatment adapted for women with low educational levels is superior to conventional pharmacotherapy in reducing key symptoms of fibromyalgia (FM), including sleep disturbances, ...

Recommended for you

Experts set strategic priorities for lymphoma research

date 18 hours ago

A committee of lymphoma experts today unveiled a strategic roadmap identifying key priority areas in both infrastructure and research that will be critical for advancing treatments for people with lymphoma. The report is meant to inform future research directions as well as fund ...

Research aims to reduce health care disparities

date 18 hours ago

The lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender/transsexual, queer/questioning and intersex (LGBTQI) population has been largely understudied by the medical community. Researchers at Moffitt Cancer Center found that the LGBTQI community ...

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.