5-question survey may increase COPD diagnoses

October 22, 2012

A simple, five-question patient-administered survey (COPD-PS) may lead to increased diagnoses of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

Researchers from David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Olmsted Medical Center, Boehringer-Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals Inc , and , randomized 9,704 patients with no prior COPD diagnosis from US primary care practices in seven states into three groups based on treatment: Arm 1: COPD-PS plus spirometry; Arm 2: COPD-PS alone; Arm 3: usual care.

Results showed that the rate of new COPD diagnoses within 8 weeks of visit 1 was statistically significantly higher in Arms 1 and 2 than Arm 3, with the highest yield seen in Arm 1, the combination screening group.

Researchers conclude that screening tools in primary care could facilitate diagnosis of COPD in primary care.

This study was presented during CHEST 2012, the annual meeting of the , held October 20 – 25, in Atlanta, Georgia.

Explore further: College education and moderate alcohol intake linked to lower COPD risk

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