Actigraphy is poor measure of eczema activity

November 5, 2012
Actigraphy is poor measure of eczema activity
The use of actigraphy to record movement as an objective surrogate for eczema activity is of limited use, according to a study published in the November issue of the British Journal of Dermatology.

(HealthDay)—The use of actigraphy to record movement as an objective surrogate for eczema activity is of limited use, according to a study published in the November issue of the British Journal of Dermatology.

Catriona I. Wootton, M.B., Ch.B., from Queen's Medical Centre in Nottingham, U.K., and colleagues collected accelerometer data from 336 participants in the Softened Water Trial to evaluate its validity as an objective measure of itch assessment in eczema. Data from actigraphy monitors were compared to three standardized scales: Six Area, Six Sign (SASSAD) severity score; Patient Oriented Eczema Measure (POEM); and Family Impact (DFI).

The researchers found that there was poor convergence of the validity of the accelerometer data with the other measures of eczema severity, with a correlation between the actigraphy and SASSAD of 0.15 (P = 0.02) and actigraphy and POEM 0.10 (P = 0.13). The correlation with the DFI was low on assessment for divergent validity against quality-of-life measures. Low, negative correlations were found when comparing the change scores from baseline to week 12 for SASSAD, POEM, and DFI with the change in scores. The meters were generally well tolerated.

"Actigraphy did not correlate well with or quality of life when used as an objective outcome measure in a multicenter clinical trial, and was not responsive to change over time," the authors write. "Further work is needed to establish why this might be, and to establish improved methods of distinguishing between eczema-related and eczema-nonrelated movements."

Explore further: Aggressive treatment of childhood eczema could help prevent asthma

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Topical treatment shows potential for infantile eczema

August 8, 2012

(HealthDay) -- Ten days of treatment with a cream containing 15(R/S)-methyl-lipoxin A4 (LXA4) is well tolerated and reduces the severity of infantile eczema, according to a study published online July 26 in the British Journal ...

Sequential oral, topical tacrolimus benefits dermatitis

September 20, 2012

(HealthDay)—Sequential therapy with oral tacrolimus and topical tacrolimus may be an effective treatment for severe atopic dermatitis (AD), according to a pilot study published in the October issue of the Journal of the ...

Recommended for you

Team makes Zika drug breakthrough

August 29, 2016

A team of researchers from Florida State University, Johns Hopkins University and the National Institutes of Health has found existing drug compounds that can both stop Zika from replicating in the body and from damaging ...

Zika virus may persist in the vagina days after infection

August 25, 2016

The Zika virus reproduces in the vaginal tissue of pregnant mice several days after infection, according to a study by Yale researchers. From the genitals, the virus spreads and infects the fetal brain, impairing fetal development. ...

In sub-Saharan Africa, cancer can be an infectious disease

August 26, 2016

In 1963, Irish surgeon Denis Parson Burkitt airmailed samples of an unusual jaw tumor found in Ugandan children to his colleague, Anthony Epstein, at Middlesex Hospital in London. Epstein, an expert in chicken viruses and ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.