Bariatric surgical procedures have similar therapeutic benefits in obese adults

November 26, 2012

Obesity is associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, both of which can be significantly improved by weight loss. Gastric bypass and adjustable gastric banding are two bariatric surgery techniques that are frequently used to effect weight loss in obese patients, but it is unclear if the two procedures produce different outcomes.

In this issue of the , researchers led by Samuel Klein at the University of Washington School of Medicine in St. Louis compared the effects of 20% weight loss induced by either gastric bypass or adjustable gastric banding on metabolic response.

They found that patients had different metabolic responses after eating, but both procedures equally improved insulin sensitivity and .

The researchers concluded that weight loss itself is primarily responsible for the therapeutic effects of gastric bypass and adjustable gastric banding in non-diabetic obese adults.

Explore further: Weight-loss surgery provides benefit to high-risk, severely obese patients

More information: Gastric bypass and banding equally improve insulin sensitivity and β-cell function, Journal of Clinical Investigation, 2012.

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