Cometriq approved for rare thyroid cancer

(HealthDay)—Cometriq (cabozantinib) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat modullary thyroid cancer that has spread to other parts of the body, the agency said Thursday.

The modullary form accounts for about 4 percent of the more than 56,000 cases of thyroid cancer diagnosed annually in the United States, the FDA said in a news release. This type of cancer develops in thyroid cells that produce a hormone that helps regulate blood calcium.

Cometriq is a kinase inhibitor that's designed to block the effects of proteins involved in cancer cell development and growth. People should not eat at least two hours before, and one hour after, taking the drug, the agency said.

Cometriq's safety and effectiveness was evaluated in clinical studies involving 330 people with modullary . Those given Cometriq lived an average of 11.2 months without , compared with an average of four months among people who took a placebo. The drug "did not extend patients' lives," the FDA said.

The product's label has a boxed warning of the potential for severe and fatal bleeding of the colon, the FDA said.

More common and less serious side effects may include diarrhea, mouth sores, redness and swelling of the fingers or toes, weight loss, and nausea.

Cometriq is marketed by Exelixis, based in San Francisco.

More information: The U.S. National Library of Medicine has more about modullary thyroid cancer.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Perjeta approved for advanced breast cancer

Jun 11, 2012

(HealthDay) -- Perjeta (pertuzumab) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat people with HER2-positive late-stage breast cancer, the agency said in a news release.

Zaltrap approved for advanced colorectal cancer

Aug 04, 2012

(HealthDay) -- Zaltrap (ziv-afilbercept) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in combination with a FOLFIRI chemotherapy regimen for adults with advanced metastatic (spreading) colorectal cancer, the ...

Marqibo approved for rare leukemia

Aug 10, 2012

(HealthDay) -- Marqibo (vincristine sulfate liposome injection) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat adults with a rare form of blood and bone marrow cancer, Philadelphia chromosome negative ...

Marqibo approved for ph- acute lymphoblastic leukemia

Aug 10, 2012

(HealthDay) -- Marqibo (vincristine sulfate liposome injection) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat adults with Philadelphia chromosome negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia ...

Recommended for you

Medical charity warns India over patent rules

Jan 21, 2015

Doctors without Borders on Wednesday warned the Indian government not to bow to US pressure to amend patent regulations that allow millions access to affordable medicines, ahead of a visit by President Barack Obama.

Why are some generic drugs getting so expensive?

Jan 21, 2015

More than eight out of every 10 prescriptions dispensed in the US is generic. This growth is due to a large number of top-selling drugs going off patent over the past decade, as well as innovations in t ...

Supreme Court sides with Teva in drug dispute

Jan 20, 2015

The Supreme Court on Tuesday sided with Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. in the company's high-profile patent dispute with rival firms over the top-selling multiple sclerosis drug.

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.