Daycare has many benefits for children, but researchers find mysterious link with overweight

Young children who attend daycare on a regular basis are 50% more likely to be overweight compared to those who stayed at home with their parents, according to a study by researchers at the University of Montreal and the CHU Sainte-Justine Hospital Research Centre. "We found that children whose primary care arrangement between 1.5 and 4 years was in daycare-center or with an extended family member were around 50% more likely to be overweight or obese between the ages of 4-10 years compared to those cared for at home by their parents," said Dr. Marie-Claude Geoffroy, who led the study. "This difference cannot be explained by known risk factors such as socioeconomic status of the parents, breastfeeding, body mass index of the mother, or employment status of the mother."

The researchers studied 1,649 families with children born in 1997-1998 in Québec. The sample was representative of the majority of Québec children. Mothers were interviewed about the care of their children at 1.5 years, 2.5 years, 3.5 years, and 4 years. The children were classified according to the type of care in which they had spent the most total hours, i.e., in a 'daycare centre' (30%), in 'family daycare' (35%), with an 'extended family member' (11%), with a 'nanny' (5%), or with their 'parents' (19%). During the six years that followed, the researchers measured the children's weight and height. Children with excessive weight or obesity were identified using international standards (IOTF).

To date, the mechanisms responsible for the increased proportion of in some child care situations remains unknown. "Diet and physical activity are avenues to follow," says Dr. Sylvana Côté, who co-directed the study. "Parents don't have to worry; however, I suggest to parents they ensure their children eat well and get enough physical activity, whether at home or at daycare."

The researchers believe that daycare has the potential to reduce weight problems in children, possibly through the promotion of and healthy eating. "The enormous potential of the impact of daycare on the nutritional health of children 2-5 years of age was also noted by the Extenso unit of the University of Montreal Nutrition Reference Centre, which has developed a Web portal specifically devoted to children in daycare," said Dr. Jean Séguin, who also co-directed this study.

The study was published in the Journal of Pediatrics.

More information: The Journal of pediatrics, 8 November 2012, in Press, DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2012.09.026

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Childhood obesity unevenly distributed in Norway

10 hours ago

Overweight, obesity and abdominal obesity are distributed unevenly among children in Norway. Maternal education level, parental marital status and whether the child lives in urban or rural areas all play ...

Sugar tax on drinks may reduce obesity

Aug 20, 2014

A suggested tax on sugar sweetened beverages has been given more credence in a research paper by academics from the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa.

Hungary schoolkids set for regular obesity checks

Aug 14, 2014

Hungarian schoolchildren are set to face annual obesity tests, the latest move in sports-loving Prime Minister Viktor Orban's drive to mould a healthier population, organisers said Thursday.

User comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

PeterD
1 / 5 (1) Nov 18, 2012
Daycare can be traumatic for young children, so they eat more to comfort themselves.