Is the detection of early markers of Epstein Barr virus of diagnostic value?

©2012, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is the cause of infectious mononucleosis and a risk for serious disease in liver transplant recipients. Molecular tests that can identify early protein markers produced by EBV may have value for diagnosing active infection. The benefits of this diagnostic approach in patients with mononucleosis and in EBV-infected transplant patients are evaluated in an article published in BioResearch Open Access.

Andrea Crowley, Jeff Connell, Kirsten Schaffer, William Halla, and Jaythoon Hassan, University College Dublin and St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland, compared three immunoassay methods for detecting antibodies produced by the body in response to EBV infection and the presence of proteins that comprise the EBV early antigen complex. The researchers determined which of the diagnostic tests could better predict EBV infection in patients with mononucleosis or in immunosuppressed adult liver transplant recipients. The article "Is There Diagnostic Value in Detection of Immunoglobulin G Antibodies to the Epstein–Barr Virus Early Antigen?" presents the complete methodology and results of this study.

"Having the ability to predict the risk of developing EBV-induced lymphoproliferative disorders after a transplant has important consequences for patient care, as it would allow for prompt therapy and could potentially decrease patient mortality," says Editor-in-Chief Jane Taylor, PhD, MRC Centre for , University of Edinburgh, Scotland.

More information: The article is available free on the BioResearch Open Access website.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Vaccine shows promise in preventing mono

Dec 10, 2007

A new study suggests that a vaccine targeting Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) may prevent infectious mononucleosis, commonly known as “mono” or “glandular fever.” The study is published in the December 15 issue of The Jo ...

Recommended for you

Doctor behind 'free radical' aging theory dies

17 hours ago

Dr. Denham Harman, a renowned scientist who developed the most widely accepted theory on aging that's now used to study cancer, Alzheimer's disease and other illnesses, has died in Nebraska at age 98.

Mexican boy who had massive tumor recovering

Nov 25, 2014

An 11-year-old Mexican boy who had pieces of a massive tumor removed and who drew international attention after U.S. officials helped him get treatment in the southwestern U.S. state of New Mexico is still recovering after ...

New medical device to make the mines safer

Nov 21, 2014

Dehydration can be a serious health issue for Australia's mining industry, but a new product to be developed with input from Flinders University's Medical Device Partnering Program (MDPP) is set to more effectively ...

US family gets $6.75 million in Botox case

Nov 20, 2014

A New York couple who said Botox treatment of their son's cerebral palsy left him with life-threatening complications and sued its manufacturer won a $6.75 million verdict from a federal jury on Thursday.

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.