Fenofibrate / simvastatin benefit in dyslipidemia explored

Fenofibrate/Simvastatin benefit in dyslipidemia explored
Combination treatment with fenofibrate and simvastatin significantly reduces postprandial triglyceride levels compared with simvastatin alone in all subjects, regardless of fasting triglyceride level, but reduces atherogenic apolipoprotein B48 particles only in those with increased fasting triglyceride levels, according to research published online Oct. 25 in Diabetes Care.

(HealthDay)—Combination treatment with fenofibrate and simvastatin (FENO-S) significantly reduces postprandial (PP) triglyceride (TG) levels compared with simvastatin alone in all subjects, regardless of fasting TG level, but reduces atherogenic apolipoprotein (apo) B48 particles only in those with increased fasting TG levels, according to research published online Oct. 25 in Diabetes Care.

Gissette Reyes-Soffer, M.D., of the Columbia University Medical Center in New York City, and colleagues conducted a study involving a subset of 139 subjects (mean age, 61 years) from the Action to Control in Diabetes lipid study (ACCORD Lipid) to evaluate the effect of combination therapy with FENO-S compared with placebo plus (PL-S) on PP lipid and lipoprotein levels. Primary measures included PP plasma TG, apoB48, and apoCIII, measured over 10 hours after an oral fat load.

The researchers found that the PP TG incremental area under the curve (IAUC) above fasting was 572 and 770 in the FENO-S and PL-S groups, respectively (P = 0.008). In the FENO-S versus the PL-S group, there was a significant reduction in PP apoB48 IAUC. On the day of the study, fasting TG levels correlated with PP TG IAUC for both FENO-S and PL-S groups. For PP TG IAUC, the fibrate effect was constant across the range of fasting TG levels, while for PP apoB48 IAUC, the reduction was only seen when fasting TG levels were increased.

"These results may have implications for interpretation of the overall ACCORD Lipid trial, which suggested benefit from FENO-S only in dyslipidemic individuals," the authors write.

One author disclosed to and Merck Pharmaceuticals, both of which provided the study medications for the ACCORD Lipid trial.

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

The Homburg Cream and Sugar study

Aug 29, 2011

The Homburg Cream and Sugar (HCS) study was designed to determine whether the measurement of postprandial triglyceride in addition to the assessment of glucose tolerance and traditional risk factors might improve the prediction ...

Mapping the genetic locus for triglycerides

Apr 25, 2008

Researchers have mapped out a region on human chromosome 1 that contributes to genetically elevated blood triglyceride levels, a major risk factor for heart disease.

Ionophore reverses Alzheimer's within days in mouse models

Jul 09, 2008

Scientists report a remarkable improvement in Alzheimer's transgenic mice following treatment with a new drug. The study, published by Cell Press in the July 10th issue of the journal Neuron, provides the first demonstration that a ...

Recommended for you

Screening for diabetes at dental visits using oral blood

7 hours ago

It is estimated that 8.1 million of the 29.1 million Americans living with diabetes are undiagnosed and many who have diabetes have poor glycemic control. Given that each year many Americans visit a dental provider but not ...

CBT, sertraline insufficient in diabetes and depression

8 hours ago

(HealthDay)—For patients with diabetes and depression, improvements in depression are seen with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) or sertraline, with a significant advantage for sertraline, but glycemic ...

Early signs in young children predict type 1 diabetes

13 hours ago

New research shows that it is possible to predict the development of type 1 diabetes. By measuring the presence of autoantibodies in the blood, it is possible to detect whether the immune system has begun to break down the ...

Daily menu plan reduces blood sugar significantly

Feb 25, 2015

A large group of people with diabetes who followed a menu plan created by University of Alberta nutrition researchers for just three months significantly reduced their blood sugar levels.

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.