Hispanics more heart-healthy than other americans: study

Hispanics more heart-healthy than other americans: study
Poor diets and obesity are still common, however.

(HealthDay)—Hispanic Americans meet more heart-healthy goals than other racial and ethnic groups in the United States, according to a new study.

Researchers analyzed data from nearly 16,000 Hispanic-American adults of Cuban, Dominican, Puerto Rican, Mexican, and Central and South American origins to determine if they met the 's seven cardiovascular for 2020.

Compared to other racial and ethnic groups in the United States, Hispanics had higher rates of ideal blood pressure, cholesterol and , were less likely to smoke, and were more likely to get recommended amounts of exercise.

Like most Americans, however, too few Hispanics ate a heart-healthy diet and too many were overweight, the investigators found.

The study found that 5 percent of Hispanic Americans met six of the seven goals, which is higher than the national average of less than 4 percent. About 53 percent had ideal blood pressure, which is nearly 22 percent higher than the national rate.

Nearly 52 percent of Hispanic Americans had ideal levels of moderate to , which is 23 percent higher than the national rate.

Only 2 percent of Hispanic Americans ate an ideal heart-healthy diet, however, and less than 25 percent had an ideal (BMI) compared to the national rate of 32 percent. BMI is a measurement of body fat based on height and weight.

The study is scheduled for presentation Tuesday at the American Heart Association's annual meeting in Los Angeles.

"We found remarkable variability in [] rates among Latino ethnicities that underscores the importance of understanding the unique cardiovascular health characteristics of this culturally diverse and increasingly important population in the United States," study lead author Hector Gonzalez, associate professor in the department of family medicine and public health at Wayne State University in Detroit, said in an association news release.

The data and conclusions of research presented at medical meetings should be considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

More information: Here's where you can learn more about the American Heart Association's heart health goals.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

US Hispanics at high risk for cardiovascular disease

Nov 05, 2012

In a study that involved more than 16,000 Hispanic/Latino men and women living in the United States, the prevalence of major cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors was high and varied markedly across different background ...

Racial make-up of community impacts obesity risk

Jun 27, 2012

The racial and ethnic composition of a community is associated with the obesity risk of individuals living within the community, according to a study led by researchers at the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) ...

Race impacts declining kidney function

Nov 20, 2010

African Americans—along with some groups of Hispanics—have faster rates of decline in kidney function compared to white Americans, according to a study presented at the American Society of Nephrology's 43rd Annual ...

Recommended for you

New treatment for inherited cholesterol

3 hours ago

At the London Olympics in 2012, South African swimmer Cameron van den Burgh dedicated his world record-breaking win in the 100m breast stroke to one of his biggest rivals and closest friends, Alexander Dale ...

Alternate approach to traditional CPR saves lives

10 hours ago

A new study shows that survival and neurological outcomes for patients in cardiac arrest can be improved by adding extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) when performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The study ...

User comments