Latest West Nile tally: 5,245 cases, 236 deaths

by Steven Reinberg, Healthday Reporter
Latest west nile tally: 5,245 cases, 236 deaths
Texas still the hardest hit state with 1,714 cases, 76 deaths, CDC says.

(HealthDay)—The West Nile virus outbreak has now reached 5,245 cases, including 236 deaths, U.S. health officials reported Wednesday.

As of Tuesday, 48 states plus the District of Columbia had reported West Nile infections in people, birds or mosquitoes. Of the cases involving people, 51 percent were classified as neuroinvasive disease (such as meningitis or encephalitis) and 49 percent were classified as non-neuroinvasive disease.

The bulk of reported cases are from 11 states—California, Illinois, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Nebraska, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Dakota and Texas. The highest number of reported cases in any one state is in Texas (1,714 cases, 76 deaths), according to the U.S. .

The best way to avoid the mosquito-borne virus is to wear and support local programs to eradicate mosquitoes. There is no treatment for West Nile virus and no vaccine to prevent it, according to the CDC.

Typically, 80 percent of people infected with the virus develop no or few symptoms, while 20 percent develop mild symptoms such as headache, joint pain, fever, skin rash and swollen lymph glands, according to the CDC.

Although most people with mild cases of West Nile virus will recover on their own, the CDC recommends that anyone who develops symptoms see their doctor right away.

People older than 50 and those with certain medical conditions, such as cancer, diabetes, hypertension, and , are at greater risk for serious illness.

The best way to protect yourself from is to avoid getting bitten by mosquitoes, which can pick up the disease from infected birds.

The CDC recommends the following steps to protect yourself:


  • Use insect repellents when outside.

  • Wear long sleeves and pants from dawn to dusk.

  • Don't leave standing water outside in open containers, such as flowerpots, buckets and kiddie pools.

  • Install or repair windows and door screens.

  • Use air conditioning when possible.

More information: For more on West Nile virus, visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

West Nile cases pass 4,500 mark nationwide: CDC

Oct 17, 2012

(HealthDay)—The number of West Nile virus cases this year has surpassed 4,500, U.S. health officials reported Wednesday, and the number of deaths has reached 183, up from 168 last week.

West Nile cases rise by 400 since last week: CDC

Sep 26, 2012

(HealthDay)—The number of new West Nile virus cases jumped by more than 400 since last week, and the death toll now stands at 147, up from 134, U.S. health officials reported Wednesday.

West Nile virus on the rise in US: CDC

Aug 02, 2012

(HealthDay) -- With 241 cases of West Nile virus and four related deaths reported so far this year, the United States is experiencing the biggest spike in the mosquito-borne illness since 2004, health officials ...

Dallas-fort worth brace for West Nile spraying

Aug 14, 2012

(HealthDay) -- The Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area -- the epicenter of the nation's worst outbreak of West Nile virus this year -- could see aerial spraying of insecticides as early as Thursday night ...

West Nile virus deaths up 35 pct in US

Sep 13, 2012

Deaths linked to the West Nile virus jumped 35 percent in the United States over the past week, amid one of the worst US outbreaks of the mosquito-borne disease, officials said Wednesday.

Recommended for you

UN releases $1.5mn to help DR Congo fight Ebola

18 minutes ago

The United Nations on Wednesday allocated $1.5 million (1.1 million euros) to help the Democratic Republic of Congo fight Ebola, just days after the country confirmed its first cases this year.

'Junk' blood tests may offer life-saving information

1 hour ago

Some 30 percent of all positive hospital blood culture samples are discarded every day because they're "contaminated"—they reflect the presence of skin germs instead of specific disease-causing bacteria.

Drug represents first potential treatment for common anemia

2 hours ago

An experimental drug designed to help regulate the blood's iron supply shows promise as a viable first treatment for anemia of inflammation, according to results from the first human study of the treatment published online today in Blood, the Journal of the American Society o ...

User comments