Education program delivered in routine care beneficial in T1DM

Education program delivered in routine care beneficial in T1DM
A structured education intervention delivered through routine care correlates with lasting improvements in glycemic control and quality of life among adults with type 1 diabetes, according to study published online Nov. 8 in Diabetes Care.

(HealthDay)—A structured education intervention delivered through routine care correlates with lasting improvements in glycemic control and quality of life among adults with type 1 diabetes, according to study published online Nov. 8 in Diabetes Care.

Debbie Cooke, Ph.D., of the University of Surrey in Guildford, U.K., and associates conducted before and after evaluations among 262 adults with type 1 diabetes to examine the impact of the Dose Adjustment for Normal Eating structured education intervention on glycemic control and quality of life when delivered within routine U.K. health care.

The researchers found that, in a subgroup with suboptimal control, there were significant improvements in glycated from baseline (9.1 percent) to six (8.6 percent) and 12 months (8.8 percent). There was a significant improvement in quality of life at three months, which was maintained at six and 12 months.

"Longer term improved glycemic control and quality of life is achievable among adults with through delivery of structured education in routine care, albeit with smaller effect sizes than reported in trials," the authors write.

More information: Abstract
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