Socioeconomic status linked to childhood peanut allergy

Peanut allergies are rising among American children and one reason might be due to economic status. According to a new study presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) Annual Scientific Meeting, greater rates of peanut allergy are found in families with higher economic status. This supports the "hygiene hypothesis" of many allergists.

This theory believes that a lack of early childhood exposure to germs increases the chance for . Over sanitization might suppress the natural development of the immune system.

"Overall is only associated with peanut sensitization in children aged one to nine years," said allergist Sandy Yip, M.D., Major, USAF, lead study author and ACAAI member. "This may indicate that development of peanut sensitization at a young age is related to affluence, but those developed later in life are not."

The study examined 8,306 patients, 776 of which had an elevated antibody level to peanuts. was generally higher in males and across all age groups. Researchers also found that peanut specific peaked in an age group of 10- to 19-year-old children, but tapered off after middle age.

"While many children can develop a tolerance to food allergens as they age, only 20 percent will outgrow a peanut allergy," said allergist Stanley Fineman, M.D., ACAAI president. "It's important that children remain under the care of a board-certified allergist to receive treatment."

According to the ACAAI, peanut allergy affects an estimated 400,000 school-aged children. It is one of the food allergens most commonly associated with sudden and severe reactions such as anaphylaxis. While avoiding peanuts may not be as difficult as avoiding wheat, there is often the risk of cross-contamination by food manufacturers.

The ACAAI recommends peanut-allergic individuals be vigilant in restaurants, where peanuts may appear as a hidden ingredient. Some chefs may use peanut butter in the preparation of sauces or marinades. Those with food allergies should also carry allergist prescribed epinephrine in the event of an emergency.

Provided by American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Peanut allergies overstated, study finds

May 16, 2007

Despite hundreds of families being told their children have peanut allergies every year, many of the children may be able to eat peanuts safely, a study by researchers at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) and Sydney ...

A potentially deadly reason to seek preventive health care

Nov 09, 2012

Emergency rooms are more crowded than ever, with more than 136 million people making a trip annually. According to a study presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) 2012 Annual Scientific ...

New food allergy model for fenugreek developed

Dec 14, 2011

A mouse model to investigate allergy to fenugreek has been developed by Norwegian researchers. The model can also be used to study cross-reactivity to peanut, soy and lupin, major food allergens with public health relevance.

New peanut allergy treatment works, study shows

Mar 21, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- Allergy experts at the University of Cambridge have convincing evidence that a new treatment for peanut allergies is effective, following a three-year trial.

Recommended for you

New perspective on sepsis

Apr 17, 2014

In a review published in the April issue of Immunity, Kevin J. Tracey, MD, president of The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, says it's time to take a fresh look at the medical community's approach to treating sepsis ...

Some immune cells defend only one organ

Apr 17, 2014

(Medical Xpress)—Scientists have uncovered a new way the immune system may fight cancers and viral infections. The finding could aid efforts to use immune cells to treat illness.

User comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

PCB
not rated yet Nov 09, 2012
Two "conclusions" {quoted below} seem contradictory. Wouldn't males be more likely to play in the dirt acquire germs? Why do minorities have higher allergy rates if allergies are more likely in families with higher economic status?

1. >"Greater rates of peanut allergy are found in families with higher economic status... lack of early childhood exposure to germs increases the chance for allergic diseases"

2. >"allergy was generally higher in males and racial minorities"