Community treatment of psych patients tied to less mortality

November 13, 2012
Community treatment of psych patients tied to less mortality
For patients with psychiatric disorders, community treatment orders correlate with a reduction in mortality, according to research published online Nov. 12 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

(HealthDay)—For patients with psychiatric disorders, community treatment orders correlate with a reduction in mortality, according to research published online Nov. 12 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

Steve Kisely, M.D., Ph.D., from Dalhousie University in Halifax, Canada, and colleagues conducted a population-based survival analysis to examine whether community treatment could reduce all-cause mortality among patients with psychiatric disorders. The study involved 2,958 patients with community treatment orders and 2,958 matched controls, all of whom were patients in in Western Australia.

Cases and controls had an average age of 36.7 years, and 63.7 percent were male. The researchers found that, among participants, schizophrenia and other non-affective psychoses were the most common diagnoses (73.4 percent). During the study, a total of 492 patients (8.3 percent) died. Patients with community treatment orders had significantly lower all-cause mortality at one, two, and three years, compared with controls, with an adjusted hazard ratio of 0.62 at two-years. The greatest reduction in mortality came from physical illnesses, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, or diseases of the , but the association disappeared when adjusting for increased outpatient and community contacts with psychiatric services.

"Community treatment orders might reduce mortality associated with preventable among patients with psychiatric disorders," the authors write. "Such a reduction may be partly explained by increased contact with health services in the community and better access to medically necessary treatments."

Explore further: Tooth loss three times higher in people with serious mental illness

More information: Abstract
Full Text

Related Stories

Combo of diabetes, depression increases post-MI mortality

February 27, 2012

(HealthDay) -- Having both diabetes and depression significantly increases the risk of dying in the years following a heart attack, beyond the increased risk from either condition alone, according to a study published in ...

NAFLD independently linked to cardiovascular disease

June 7, 2012

(HealthDay) -- Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is independently associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), but it is not associated with a statistically significantly increased risk of cardiovascular ...

Clopidogrel after MI less effective in diabetes patients

September 5, 2012

(HealthDay)—Clopidogrel therapy following a heart attack does less to reduce the risk of death in patients with diabetes than in those without diabetes, according to a study published in the Sept. 5 issue of the Journal ...

Methotrexate use linked to reduced mortality in RA

October 14, 2012

(HealthDay)—Use of methotrexate for one year or more is associated with a reduction in the risk of mortality for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), according to a study published online Oct. 8 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

Statin use at cancer diagnosis linked to lower mortality

November 8, 2012

(HealthDay)—For patients with cancer, statin use prior to diagnosis correlates with reduced all-cause and cancer-related mortality, according to a study published in the Nov. 8 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Recommended for you

In analyzing a scene, we make the easiest judgments first

September 3, 2015

Psychology researchers who have hypothesized that we classify scenery by following some order of cognitive priorities may have been overlooking something simpler. New evidence suggests that the fastest categorizations our ...

Forensic examiners pass the face matching test

September 1, 2015

The first study to test the skills of FBI agents and other law enforcers who have been trained in facial recognition has provided a reassuring result - they perform better than the average person or even computers on this ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.