Brazil to begin tracking numbers of HIV cases

December 27, 2012

(AP)—Brazilian health officials say doctors will be required to notify authorities of every HIV case in the nation.

Until now, doctors were only required to notify state and federal officials when patients developed AIDS.

Brazil's says Thursday the move is an effort to advance highly lauded efforts to combat AIDS.

All in Brazil can receive free drug treatment—a program that now reaches 223,000 people and costs the nation nearly $700 million a year.

have said they believe here are another 250,000 Brazilians infected with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. But nobody knows for certain because up to now HIV cases haven't been tracked. Officials hope earlier treatment will prolong patients' lives.

Nearly 241,500 people died of AIDS in Brazil from 1980-2010.

Explore further: Brazil expands its anti-AIDS program

shares

Related Stories

Brazil expands its anti-AIDS program

August 29, 2012

(AP) —Brazil's anti-AIDS program will be expanded to include at least 35,000 more people, a Health Ministry official said Wednesday.

New UN AIDS deputy hails Brazil progress

December 22, 2012

The newly appointed deputy chief of the United Nations HIV-fighting program, Brazilian Luiz Loures, hailed his own country's achievements in the fight against the deadly global epidemic in an interview published Saturday.

Recommended for you

Broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies pave the way for vaccine

September 26, 2016

A small number of people infected with HIV produce antibodies with an amazing effect: Not only are the antibodies directed against the own virus strain, but also against different sub-types of HIV that circulate worldwide. ...

Targeting dormant HIV

September 19, 2016

Discovery of a novel, advanced technique to identify the rare cells where human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) hides in patients taking antiretroviral therapy (ART). This is an important step forward in the search for a HIV/AIDS ...

Training human antibodies to protect against HIV

September 8, 2016

During HIV infection, the virus mutates too rapidly for the immune system to combat, but some people produce antibodies that can recognize the virus even two years after infection. With an eye towards developing a vaccine, ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.