Clinical trial targets advanced prostate cancer

Select patients with advanced prostate cancer may benefit from a Georgia Health Sciences University Cancer Center clinical trial that looks to improve survival rates of the FDA-approved prostate cancer drug Provenge.

The trial, led by GHSU Cancer Center Director Samir N. Khleif, is the first in the country to investigate combining Provenge with two other cancer-fighting drugs, CT-011 and cyclophosphamide. As the first FDA-approved immunotherapy treatment for prostate cancer, Provenge has been found to extend life expectancy of certain men with advanced prostate cancer by nearly 20 percent.

"Although the increased overall survival seen with Provenge treatment is a welcome advance in the treatment of prostate cancer, the goal of cancer therapy must be the eradication of disease," said Khleif. "Therefore, improvements can be made, and this clinical trial is intended to improve the current standard of care."

Provenge works by training the body's immune system to find and attack . Khleif's trial hopes to boost Provenge's effectiveness by combining it with two other drugs: CT-011, a type of antibody that reverses caused by cancer, and cyclophosphamide, which in a low dose enhances the effect of Provenge and CT-011. Both have been safely used alone or in combination with other cancer therapies, but never for prostate cancer.

Preclinical animal studies in Khleif's lab found that the combination of Provenge with these two other drugs led to a significant increase in survival and complete in more than 50 percent of mice. Based on these results, Dendreon Corporation, the makers of Provenge, and Khleif are collaborating on this first in human trial.

Khleif joined the GHSU Cancer Center as its Director after more than 22 years in the Section at the . His lab focuses on research into vaccines to help the immune system target and eradicate cancers.

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer deaths among men in most Western countries.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Medicare confirms payment for prostate cancer drug

Jun 30, 2011

(AP) -- Medicare officials confirmed Thursday that the program will cover the $93,000 price tag for prostate cancer drug Provenge, an innovative therapy that typically gives men suffering from an incurable stage of the disease ...

Medicare to pay for $93,000 prostate cancer drug

Mar 30, 2011

(AP) -- Medicare officials said Wednesday that the program will pay the $93,000 cost of prostate cancer drug Provenge, an innovative therapy that gives men suffering from the disease an extra four months to live, on average.

Prostate cancer vaccine extends survival in study

Apr 28, 2009

(AP) -- An experimental treatment added four months to the lives of men with advanced prostate cancer, doctors reported Tuesday in a study that tested an entirely new approach to fighting the disease.

Recommended for you

Is the HPV vaccine necessary?

5 hours ago

As the school year starts in full swing many parents wonder if their child should receive the HPV vaccine, which is recommended for girls ages 11-26 and boys 11-21. There are a lot of questions and controversy around this ...

User comments